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CHILD CARE
REGULATIONS FOR LICENSURE
STATE OF RHODE ISLAND
DEPARTMENT OF CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES
Revised 10/24/2013
 
 
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
SECTION ONE – GENERAL PROVISIONS                                                  
I.     LEGAL BASIS                                                                                    
II.     DEFINITION                                                                                      
 
SECTION TWO – LICENSING PROVISIONS                                       
I.     APPLICATION PROCESS                                            
II.     LICENSE                                                 
III.     LICENSE RENEWAL                             
IV.     DENIAL, REVOCATION OR SUSPENSION OF LICENSE                             
V.     VARIANCE                                                      
VI.     PROCEDURE FOR APPEAL/HEARING              
 
SECTION THREE – LICENSING STANDARDS                                       
I.     PHYSICAL SPACE AND SAFETY                                       
II.     HEALTH AND NUTRITION                                            
III.     ENROLLMENT AND STAFFING                                  
IV.     STAFF QUALIFICATIONS AND ONGOING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT REQUIREMENTS
V.     CRIMINAL RECORD BACKGROUND CHECK(S) AND CLEARNACE OF AGENCY ACTIVITY    
VI.     ADMINISTRATION                                                 
VII.     CURRICULUM                                                      
VIII.     FAMILY ENGAGEMENT                                       
 
SECTION ONE - GENERAL PROVISIONS
 
I.     LEGAL BASIS
 
RIGL 42-72 – Department of Children, Youth and Families
RIGL 42-72.10-1 – Licensing and Monitoring of Child Care Providers and Child-Placing Agencies
RIGL 40-13.2 – Certification of Child Care and Youth Serving Agency Workers
RIGL 23-28.15 – Child Care Programs
 
II.     DEFINITION
The primary purpose of licensing a child care program is to safeguard the well-being of the children served.  Granting a license means there is clear evidence that the building and grounds are safe, staff are appropriately trained and responsible, and the program reflects an understanding of the healthy growth and development of children.  The license provides assurance to families and the community that the children are cared for in a safe, healthy environment with appropriate activities, time schedules, food, materials and equipment, and that staff are consistently available to encourage and support the children's physical, social, emotional and intellectual growth.
 
SECTION TWO - LICENSING PROVISIONS
 
I.     APPLICATION PROCESS
 
A.     Procedure for Obtaining a License
 
B.     Application Packet
1.     An application for licensure is filed on the forms provided by the Department’s licensing unit.
2.     A separate application is filed for each program to be operated.
3.     A complete application, including all supporting documentation, is submitted.  The application includes, but is not limited to:
a.     the full name, physical address, mailing address, email address and phone number of the prospective program;
b.     the full name and address of the applicant;
c.     information on incorporation, including the names, addresses and titles of the board of directors of the corporation;
d.     information on the building in which the program will be housed, including sketches of the indoor area showing the activity rooms to be used for child care, the kitchen or food preparation area, the bathrooms for children and staff and the office space;
e.     information on the outdoor play area, including a sketch of this area showing accessibility to the building and the rooms used for child care;
f.     information on the number and ages of children to be served, age groupings and staff/child ratios;
g.     information on staffing, including the name and qualifications of the program administrator, education coordinator and other identified staff;
h.     medical information on staff;
i.     employment history;
j.     criminal record background check including fingerprinting, and clearance of agency activity check;
k.     information on the program, including the daily schedule of activities, the philosophy of the program and the developmental goals and objectives on which the program will be based;
l.     a listing of the equipment and materials, both indoor and outdoor, available for the implementation of the program;
m.     information on the daily feeding program;
n.     financial information, including a statement of the financial assets, liabilities and net worth of the applicant, the means of financing and an anticipated yearly budget for the program; and
o.     staff/parent handbooks (including, but not limited to: policies/ procedures/protocols); and
p.     a statement signed by the applicant acknowledging that he/she has read and agrees to comply with these regulations.
 
C.     Inspection Approvals
1.     Prior to the issuance of a license:
a.     documentation of the program’s compliance with local zoning ordinances and with the applicable sections of the state fire, building, health and sanitation codes is submitted.
b.     the Department’s licensing worker visits the program to determine compliance with the regulations and to determine the maximum capacity.
2.     Upon receipt of a completed application, inspection approvals and a report from the Department’s licensing worker addressing compliance with the regulations, one of the following actions occurs:
a.     issuance of a provisional license; or
b.     issuance of a full license; or
c.     denial of licensure.
 
II.     LICENSE
 
A.     Provisional License
1.     A provisional license is issued to a newly established program upon successful completion of the application process.
2.     This license is granted for a period not to exceed six months.
3.     The provisional license allows the licensee time to develop an operational program that meets the needs of the children served and to demonstrate the program complies with these regulations.
4.     Prior to the expiration of a provisional license, the child care program is evaluated to determine compliance with these regulations.
 
B.     Full License
1.     A full license is issued to a program that complies with these regulations.
2.     The license is valid for a period not to exceed one year, expiring annually on July 31.
 
C.     Probationary License
1.     A probationary license is issued in place of a full license at any time when a licensee is temporarily unable to comply with a regulation or regulations, provided that the area or areas of noncompliance do not present an immediate threat to the health and well-being of the children.
2.     Before a probationary license is issued, the licensee submits written documentation that the area(s) of non-compliance do not present a threat to the health and well-being of the children and a plan to correct the area(s) of non-compliance.
3.     This plan is approved by the Department’s licensing administrator or designee.
4.     The reason for the issuance of a probationary license is printed on the license.
 
D.     Provisions of the License:
1.     The license indicates the maximum number of children and the age groups to be served in the program.
2.     The license indicates the dates of validity.
3.     The license is posted in a conspicuous place in the program.
4.     The license is not transferable, is granted only to the designated licensee and is limited to the stated location.
5.     The licensee notifies the Department’s licensing unit in writing of major changes which affect the license including, but not limited to:
a.     intent to change the name of the program;
b.     intent to change ownership of the program,
c.     intent to change the physical location of the program;
d.     change of administrator or site coordinator;
e.     change in the numbers or ages of children served; and/or
f.     any major changes in the program.
6.     The license entitles the Director of the Department or designee and the Office of the Child Advocate or designee:
a.     the right of entrance; and
b.     the privilege to inspect and have access to all files in order to ascertain compliance with these regulations; and
c.     the right to investigate complaints.
7.     When the operation of a child care program is discontinued, the licensee provides the Department’s licensing unit with written notification at least thirty days prior to the closure.
 
III.     LICENSE RENEWAL
 
A.     Renewal of License
1.     A licensee files a renewal application on the forms provided by the Department’s licensing unit at least sixty days prior to the expiration of the license.
2.     Current inspection approvals are submitted prior to renewal to verify that the program remains in compliance with the appropriate sections of the state fire, building, health and sanitation codes.
3.     Upon receipt of a renewal application and appropriate inspection approvals, one of the following actions is taken:
a.     issuance of a probationary license; or
b.     issuance of a full license; or
c.     denial of licensure.
 
B.     Licensing workers from the Department’s licensing unit make periodic unannounced monitoring visits to the program during the hours of operation in order to determine compliance with the regulations.
 
IV.     DENIAL, REVOCATION OR SUSPENSION OF LICENSE
 
A.     Revocation or Denial of a License
1.     A license is denied or revoked for failure to comply with these regulations or when there is evidence that the operation of the program poses a threat to the health and/or safety of children enrolled.
2.     The licensing administrator notifies an applicant or licensee in writing of the Department's decision to deny or revoke a license.
3.     The written notification contains the reason for the denial or revocation.
4.     Notice of denial or revocation is sent to the applicant or licensee at least ten days prior to the effective date of the action, unless there is sufficient evidence to warrant immediate closure.
 
B.     If necessary, the licensing administrator orders the immediate removal of all children and the closing of the program.
 
C.     The applicant or licensee has the right to a hearing on the denial or revocation of a license.  All administrative hearings for appeals relating to licensing violations or terms are held in accordance with DCYF Policy 100.0055, Complaints and Hearings.
 
V.     VARIANCE
 
A.     The licensing administrator may allow a variance to a regulation provided that the variance in no way jeopardizes the health, safety or well-being of the children.
 
B.     The licensee submits a written request for variance to the licensing administrator.
1.     This request contains documentation as to how the licensee plans to meet the intent of the regulation to be varied.
2.     The licensing administrator may request additional documentation as deemed necessary.
 
VI.     PROCEDURE FOR APPEAL/HEARING
 
A.     Any applicant for licensure or license holder may appeal any action or decision of a Departmental staff, supervisor or administrator that is adverse to the person’s status as an applicant or license holder.
 
B.     A written request for a hearing is submitted to the licensing administrator prior to the effective date of the action or within ten days of receipt of the written notice of denial.
 
C.     All administrative appeals/hearings relating to licensing actions or decisions are held in accordance with DCYF Policy 100.0055, Complaints and Hearings.
 
SECTION THREE - LICENSING STANDARDS
 
I.     PHYSICAL SPACE AND SAFETY
 
A.     Physical Facilities
1.     The indoor and outdoor facilities foster the children's growth and development through a variety of opportunities for safe exploration and learning.
2.     Prior to licensing, physical facilities:
a.     comply with building, fire, health and sanitation codes;
b.     provide evidence that the program and water source are lead free or lead safe;
c.     provide evidence that the program is asbestos free or asbestos safe;
d.     have an acceptable score on a radon test within the last three years; and
e.     can accommodate children and adults with disabilities in accordance with the American with Disabilities Act (ADA).
3.     Plans for the erection of new buildings or playgrounds or for the renovation or modification of existing buildings or playgrounds are submitted to the Department for review prior to the start of construction.
4.     The program’s exterior doors are locked.
a.     The program's designated main entrance has a doorbell, buzzer, keypad, swipe card or other comparable means to control entry.
b.     Unlocked doors are monitored at all times by a staff person.
5.     Stairways used by children have a second railing placed at the appropriate height for the children's use.
 
B.     Location of Child Care Rooms
1.     Program rooms for infants and/or toddlers are located on the ground level where there is direct access to the outside without the use of stairs.
2.     Program rooms for preschool children are permitted on the first or second floor.
3.     If a classroom for preschoolers is located on the second floor, the evacuation plan is appropriate for children of that age and developmental ability.
4.     All facilities, including classrooms, bathrooms, gross motor spaces and libraries used by the children, are located on the same floor level as the activity rooms or classrooms.
5.     Facilities used by the children are not located below ground level.
 
C.     Ventilation and Lighting
1.     There is adequate ventilation and lighting throughout the program.
2.     All activity rooms used for children have natural lighting through a window or a skylight directly to the outdoors.
3.     Exterior doors and windows, which are opened for ventilation, are securely screened.
4.     The temperature in rooms used by children is maintained within a range of 65 - 74 degrees F° at the level of the children's height, and the heat is kept constant.
5.     Rooms where infants are cared for are maintained at a minimum of 68 degrees F° at crib height.
6.     There is a minimum of 300 cubic feet of air space for each child.
7.     Portable space heaters are prohibited.
 
D.     Square Footage
1.     There is a minimum of forty-five square feet of usable floor space for each child in activity rooms or classrooms used for infant and/or toddler care.
2.     There is a minimum of thirty-five square feet of usable floor space for each child in activity rooms or classrooms used for preschool children.
3.     Program licensing capacity is determined by adding up the total capacity of approved groups for that program.  Refer to Section III.  Enrollment and Staffing, C. Staff/Child Ratio and Maximum Group Size.
 
E.     Classroom/Activity Room
1.     Classrooms are separate areas with floor to ceiling walls.
2.     If floor to ceiling walls are not possible, then classrooms areas may be partitioned with dividers, cubbies or bookcases of at least four feet in height, which are securely fastened to the floor or wall and completely separate groups of children.
 
F.     Infant and Toddler Space
1.     Children under the age of three years have rooms or areas physically separate from those used by children three years and over.
2.     Transition rooms or areas are permitted for children who are between thirty-three months and thirty-nine months of age.
 
G.     Areas
1.     Indoor activity is clearly defined by spatial arrangement.
2.     Space is subdivided into areas and is arranged to provide clear pathways for movement from one area to another, to separate noisy activities from quieter ones and to provide for visual supervision by staff.
3.     Furniture is placed to ensure safety and ease of supervision.
 
H.     Storage Space
1.     There is adequate space for the storage of individual clothing with hooks at the children's level.
2.     There is adequate storage space for equipment, including cots and blankets, materials, supplies and seasonal toys.
 
I.     Isolation Area
1.     There is an isolation area equipped with a cot to accommodate a child who becomes ill.
2.     This area is located near a lavatory and is visible to staff.
3.     A sick child is isolated a minimum of three feet away from the other children.
 
J.     There is a utility room, separate from the kitchen, with hot and cold water and storage space for cleaning equipment and supplies.
 
K.     Space is provided for administrative and clerical functions.
 
L.     The Outdoor Play Area:
1.     Is appropriately equipped for gross motor activity.
2.     Has at least seventy-five square feet of space per child for at least 50% of the capacity of the program.
3.     Is easily accessible with a plan for how the outdoor space is utilized to support quality programming and ensure safety.
4.     Has a fence of at least four feet in height, erected on ground that is reasonably level, well-drained and free from hazards.
5.     Climbing equipment, swings and large pieces of play equipment are securely anchored and maintained in good repair.
6.     Outdoor equipment (including but not limited to swings, slides and climbing apparatus) is:
a.     age and developmentally appropriate;
b.     installed, maintained and used in accordance with manufacturers’ specifications and instructions; and
c.     approved by the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission.
7.     Cushioning materials such as mats, wood chips or sand are used under climbers, slides, revolving equipment or swings.
8.     Organic cushioning is at least six inches in depth, if used.
9.     The outdoor play area for infants and/or toddlers is separate from that used by older children.
10.     Trampolines are prohibited.
 
M.     Toilet Facilities
1.     Programs serving children under the age of thirty-six months have one toilet and one sink for each group of twenty children.
2.     Programs serving children three years and older have one toilet and one sink for each group of ten children.
3.     Hand washing sinks have both warm and cold running water set to appropriate hand washing temperatures.
4.     Water temperature is at least 60 degrees F° and does not exceed 120 degrees F°.
5.     There is a diaper changing area and an adjacent adult hand washing sink with warm and cold running water for each group of twenty children under the age of three years.
6.     Diaper changing areas and adult hand washing sinks are separate and apart from any food preparation area.
7.     There are separate toilet facilities in the same building for staff.
 
N.     Drinking Water
1.     Safe drinking water is available to children both indoors and outdoors at all times and is offered at intervals that are responsive to the needs of the individual children.
2.     Children are encouraged to drink water throughout the day, especially before, during and after outdoor play.
3.     Drinking water supplies are located in or near classrooms and playrooms.
4.     Drinking cups are single-use and disposable, or reusable cups are used that are sanitized daily in a dishwasher with a sanitizing option.
5.     The source of drinking water is separate from the lavatory.
6.     Water fountains are not permitted in the child care program unless disposable single-use cups are used or the program provides an approved plan for the maintenance and sanitation of the water fountain.
7.     Use of water fountains outside the licensed program is prohibited.
 
O.     Food Preparation Area
1.     There is an equipped kitchen for food preparation when meals are prepared at the program.
2.     When meals are not prepared at the program, there is an equipped food preparation area to be used exclusively for food handling and distribution including the preparation of snacks.
3.     The kitchen or food preparation area is sanitary, well lit and orderly with adequate refrigeration temperatures of 41 F° or lower for refrigerator and zero F° or lower for freezer.
4.     There is sufficient storage and appropriate handling of supplies.
5.     The program has a dishwasher with a sanitizing option to sterilize dishes or only uses disposable options.
 
P.     Cleanliness
1.     All parts of the program and its premises are kept in good repair, clean, neat and free of hazards.
2.     Any product used for cleaning, sanitizing and disinfecting is United States Environmental Protection Agency registered and is used in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.
3.     Any necessary maintenance is done when children are not present.
4.     The following methods for preventing rodent and insect infestation are used:
a.     thorough sanitation and proper screening;
b.     use of insecticides and rodenticides in accordance with instructions on the label;
c.     structure blocking of avenues through which insects and rodents could gain access to the building; and
d.     insecticides and rodenticides approved by the Rhode Island Department of Health.
5.     All equipment and materials are clean and sanitary and checked regularly.
 
Q.     Telephone
1.     There is a telephone, other than a pay phone, conveniently located within the program.
2.     The telephone is functional and readily available for use in case of an emergency.
3.     Emergency phone numbers, including 911, local fire and police departments, emergency treatment facility, consulting physician or nurse and poison control center are posted in a conspicuous place adjacent to the phone.
4.     Staff do not use personal cell phones while supervising children.
 
R.     Furniture
1.     Is sufficient in quantity to accommodate the number of children enrolled.
2.     Is safe, durable, child-sized and easily cleaned.
3.     Conforms to all applicable safety regulations.
4.     Is sufficient to ensure that seating is provided for every child.
 
S.     Cots and Cribs
1.     A crib is provided for each infant (birth to eighteen months).  Infants may never use a cot.
2.     A cot or a full size crib is provided for each toddler (age eighteen to thirty-six months).
3.     A cot is provided for each preschool child (age three to five).
4.     There is one crib equipped with wheels for every five children under two years.  This crib is used for evacuation in the event of an emergency.
5.     Cribs and cots are washed and sanitized before reassignment to another child.
6.     There is at least two feet of space between each cot and/or crib during nap/rest time.
7.     The program maintains proof onsite that each crib used meets the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission Standards for baby cribs.
8.     Pack-in-plays, playpens and other portable cribs are not permitted.
 
T.     Infant Equipment
1.     The infant area contains comfortable seating for staff, including at least one rocking chair.
2.     The program ensures availability of an adequate supply of clean diapers, bed linens and clothing changes.
3.     The program has a choke prevention gauge which is used to determine if an object is large enough so as not to be swallowed by a child.
4.     The use of walkers is prohibited.
5.     Baby corrals and play-yards are prohibited.
 
U.     Dual Occupancy
1.     It is preferable that the premises not be shared by other groups when the program is not in operation.  However, with sufficient safeguards for cleanliness, protection of equipment and sanitation, dual occupancy may be permitted.
2.     A formal request for approval for shared use of the premises is appended to the application.
 
II.     HEALTH AND NUTRITION
 
A.     Immunization and Testing for Communicable Diseases
1.     Child care programs must adopt, at a minimum, policies and procedures consistent with the Rhode Island Rules and Regulations Pertaining to Immunization and Communicable Disease in Preschool, School, Colleges or Universities.
2.     These regulations are accessible on the Rhode Island Department of Health’s website: http://www.health.ri.gov/immunization/for/schools/.
 
B.     Immunization Records
1.     Upon a child’s first entry to any child care program the parent or guardian provides to the program administrator:
a.     evidence that the child has been immunized or is being immunized according to schedule; or
b.     an immunization exemption form from a licensed physician stating that the child is not a fit subject for immunization for medical reasons; or
c.     a certificate signed by the parent or guardian stating that immunizations are contrary to his/her beliefs.  (Form is available through the Office of Disease Control at the Rhode Island Department of Health).
2.     No child may enter a child care program unless evidence is submitted that the child has received initial doses of required vaccines.
3.     The program is responsible for maintaining a current record of immunizations for the child who is not fully immunized; documenting when immunizations take place, and following up with the parent to ensure that the child is being immunized according to schedule.
4.     Acceptable evidence of immunization consists of:
a.     a written statement signed by a licensed physician; or
b.     an official immunization record card, school immunization record, medical passport, World Health Organization immunization record; or
c.     other official immunization record acceptable to the Office of Disease Control of the Rhode Island Department of Health; or
d.     electronically stored and/or transmitted documentary record (facsimile transmission, computerized records, records on magnetic media or similar record) as may be utilized by a program/school.
5.     The immunization record must contain the day, month and year of each dose of vaccine administered.
6.     When a child transfers to another program or school, the child's immunization record is released to the authorized program or school official.
 
C.     Health Examination
1.     The parent submits evidence of a preadmission health examination for the child, which includes information regarding any condition or handicap affecting the child's general health.
2.     Each program requires additional health examinations or information yearly in order to maintain current information and assure the full participation of each child in the program.
 
D.     Lead Screening
1.     A lead screening test (FeP) is done annually for each child between the ages of nine months and six years.
2.     A child may require additional lead screenings as recommended by the Rhode Island Department of Health.
 
E.     Daily Health Assessment
1.     The program conducts a daily health assessment of each child.
2.     A child who gives any evidence of suspicious symptoms is removed from the group and attended to by staff until the parent, or adult authorized by the parent, can come for the child.
3.     Each child's file contains a statement signed by the parents authorizing the program to act in an emergency.
 
F.     Preadmission Intakes
1.     Preadmission intakes are scheduled to secure health and family history, to obtain background information on the child and his/her home and to develop the child's program.
2.     Areas of discussion include, but are not limited to:
a.     child’s strengths and needs;
b.     family’s goals for a child;
c.     family history and background;
d.     necessary supports and accommodations to ensure the child’s health, safety, early learning and development;
e.     copy of program policies and procedures as part of preadmission forms.
 
G.     Communicable Disease
1.     A child or staff member suffering from a reportable communicable disease follows timelines of absence prior to returning to the program as specified in the Rhode Island Department of Health, Division of Disease Prevention and Control, Office of Communicable Disease, Guidelines For Communicable Disease Prevention And Control.
 
2.     In the event a child or staff member suffers from a communicable disease, the program provides written notice to inform all parents to which communicable disease the child(ren) may have been exposed, without providing any identifying information regarding the source of the communicable disease.
3.     In all matters of exclusion and readmission of children for reasons of illness, the decision of the program administrator, in consultation with a licensed physician, applies.
 
H.     Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting
1.     Any suspected case of child abuse and/or neglect is reported to the Department of Children, Youth and Families CPS hotline (1-8OO-RI-CHILD) within twenty-four hours in accordance with state law and DCYF Policy 500.0000: Reporting Child Abuse and/or Neglect .
2.     Any death or serious injury while in care of the program is reported to the Department of Children, Youth and Families CPS hotline (1-8OO-RI-CHILD) within twenty-four hours.
3.     The program reports to the Department’s licensing unit immediately after reporting to the CPS hotline.
 
I.     Corporal Punishment and Restraint
1.     Staff do not physically restrain children.
2.     Staff do not restrain a child in a high chair for reasons other than feeding/ eating.
3.     Staff do not hit, grab, push or pull the children or engage in any form of corporal punishment.
4.     Children are not subjected to cruel or severe punishment, humiliation, physical punishment, threats or verbal abuse, including yelling or derogatory remarks.
5.     Children are not ignored or neglected.
6.     Children are not deprived of meal, snacks, physical activity or outdoor play as a reward or behavior consequence.  Exceptions may only be made if specifically stated in a child’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) or Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP).
7.     Children are not punished for soiling, wetting or not using the toilet.
 
J.     First Aid
1.     First aid equipment is available for the less serious problems, including but not limited to; common cuts, splinters and brush burns.
2.     All staff members have knowledge of general first aid procedures.
3.     At least 50% of all staff members involved in direct care who are trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and who have completed the Red Cross basic first aid course or the equivalent are in attendance in the program at all times.
4.     Each program has a choke-saving poster outlining the Heimlich Maneuver, which is prominently displayed in the area where the children eat.
5.     Programs serving infants and toddlers have at least one staff member trained in the use of the Heimlich Maneuver with this age group available in the program at all times.
 
K.     Injury Report
1.     Parent must sign a written report on the day that an injury occurs.
2.     A copy of this report is placed in the child's file.
3.     The injury, first aid and parent communication is recorded in the program’s health log.
 
L.     Administration of Medication
1.     Each program establishes guidelines for the administration of medications.
2.     If a program chooses to administer medication:
a.     Neither prescribed nor non-prescribed medications are administered to a child without written parental authorization.
b.     Prescribed medication is not administered to a child without a written order from a licensed physician (which may include the label on the medication) indicating that the medicine is for a specified child and medication is in the original container.
c.     The written order includes the name of the prescribed medication, circumstances under which it may be administered, dosage and frequency of administration.
d.     The program administrator or designee dispenses all medications.
e.     The program maintains, on a daily basis, a written record of every medication administered.  This record includes the:
i.     child's name;
ii.     name and dosage of  medication administered;
iii.     date and time administered;
iv.     name and signature of the person who administered the medication; and
v.     name of the licensed physician prescribing the medication.
f.     In the event of an emergency, the daily log is transported with the child to the emergency treatment facility.
g.     Medications are stored in clearly labeled original containers out of reach of children.
h.     The program advises parents to administer medications at home whenever possible.
 
M.     Storage of Toxic Substances
1.     All medical supplies, poisonous or toxic substances and any other items of potential danger to children, including but not limited to; cleaning supplies and equipment, paints, plastic bags and aerosols, are stored out of reach of children in a locked area.
2.     These items are clearly labeled.
 
N.     Children with Special Health Care Needs
1.     If there are children in the program who have special health care needs, specific health procedures are delivered, where appropriate, by a licensed/certified health professional or a staff person who has been trained to appropriately carry out such procedures.
2.     Such procedures may include, but are not limited to; epi pen, nebulizer, and insulin injections.
3.     Children with special needs are provided opportunities for active play while other children are physically active.
 
O.     Children with Food Allergies or Special Nutrition Needs
1.     For each child with food allergies or special nutritional needs, the program requests the family to obtain from the child’s health care provider an individualized care plan.
2.     The program protects children with food allergies from contact with the problem food.
3.     The program asks families of a child with food allergies to give consent for publicly posting information about that child’s food allergy.
a.     If consent is given, that information is posted in the food preparation area and in the areas of the program the child uses.
b.     If consent for posting is not provided, then this information is shared verbally with all relevant staff, including substitutes.
 
P.     Health and Safety Training
1.     The program ensures that specific training is provided to staff to appropriately address health and safety of children with developmental delays/disabilities, special health/nutrition needs and medical needs.
2.     Nutrition education is offered to staff at least one time per year.
3.     Physical activity education is offered to staff at least one time per year.
 
Q.     Fire Drills and Evacuation Plans
1.     The program administrator or designee conducts at least fifteen fire drills every twelve months.
2.     Both obstructed and unobstructed drills are conducted and a record of such drills is maintained.
3.     Programs with night care conduct fire drills during their hours of operation at night.
4.     A graphic evacuation plan, identifying alternative escape routes, is posted in each classroom and is in compliance with state fire code.
5.     The program has a written fire evacuation plan, which includes specific provisions for the evacuation of infants, toddlers, children and staff with special needs.
6.     This plan is reviewed and approved annually by the state or local fire inspector.
 
R.     Cleaning and Sanitizing Routines
1.     Staff wash their hands with liquid soap and warm running water as needed and:
a.     after each diaper change;
b.     after each toileting;
c.     after wiping a runny nose; and
d.     before any food preparation or service.
2.     Staff ensure that children wash their hands with liquid soap and warm running water as needed and:
a.     after each toileting;
b.     before each meal or snack;
c.     after wiping or blowing their nose; and
d.     after outdoor activities or returning from playground.
3.     Sinks used for food preparation or clean up are not used for hand washing after toileting or diaper changing.
4.     Products, schedules and procedures used for cleaning are consistent with the recommendations of Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards: Guidelines for Out-of-Home Child Care, A Joint Collaborative Project of the American Academy of Pediatrics, American Public Health Association and National Resource Program for Health and Safety in Child Care.
5.     The program posts and follows a cleaning and sanitation schedule.
 
S.     Meals and Snacks
1.     The program provides breakfast or a mid-morning snack and a mid-afternoon snack.
2.     Nutritionally balanced meals are served at suitable intervals.
3.     Breakfast and/or dinner is/are provided for children who are in care for more than nine hours.
4.     There is a supply of food available in the program to provide nutritional meals to children whose parents do not provide food, and to supplement any foods brought by children which is not nutritional or of sufficient quantity.
5.     Each meal includes one-third of the total daily nutritional requirements recommended by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).
6.     Meals and snacks meet current USDA Child and Adult Care Food Program nutritional standards.  Snacks include fruits, vegetables and milk.
7.     If the parent provides lunches or other meals, the program gives parents written nutrition guidelines at the time of enrollment.
8.     High fat, high sugar and high salt foods are served less than one time per week or are not served at all.
9.     Additional servings:
a.     are available when a child remains hungry;
b.     meet nutritional standards; and
c.     are not required to be the same food as the first serving.
10.     On special occasions, such as parties, food and drink that does not meet nutritional requirements may be served in addition to required meals and snacks.
11.     Menus for meals and/or snacks are planned on a five week rotating basis and are posted weekly.
12.     At least one child care provider sits with children at the table during meals and snack time and engages with children to model appropriate mealtime behavior.
13.     Children are not forced to eat and food is not used as a reward.
 
T.     Beverages
1.     Children between one and two years of age are served whole milk when not served breast milk or formula.
2.     Children two years of age and older are served skim or one percent milk.
3.     If a program serves juice, it must be 100% fruit juice.
a.     Infants are not served fruit juice.
b.     Children over eighteen months of age may not consume more then six ounces of juice per day.
4.     The program does not serve or allow drinks sweetened artificially or with sugar, including soda and flavored milk.
5.     The program does not serve or allow caffeinated drinks, including soda and energy drinks.
 
U.     Infant/Toddler Feeding
1.     A feeding plan is established for each infant and toddler prior to admission.  The plan is developed in consultation with the parent, is based on the recommendation of the child's health care provider and is reviewed at least every six months.
2.     Individual feeding plans are followed, except for toddlers who are mature enough to eat on a schedule.
3.     Infants who are unable to sit in feeding chairs are held while fed.
4.     Bottles are not propped at any time and children are not fed in a crib.
5.     Children who are not ready for self-feeding are fed by an individual staff member on a one-to-one basis.
6.     Self-feeding is encouraged and appropriate finger foods are provided.  A clean, sanitized training cup is provided for each child ready to begin drinking from a cup.
7.     Solid foods are introduced to infants and toddlers in accordance with the physician's recommendation or as specified by the parent.
8.     Single use cloths or towelettes are used for washing children's faces and hands before and after eating.
9.     A heating unit for warming bottles and food is readily accessible to staff.
10.     Microwaves are not used for heating bottles.
11.     Only BPA free plastic or glass bottles are used.
12.     For each child under eighteen months of age, a daily log is maintained to record information on eating, drinking, changing, napping and behavior.  This log is provided in writing to the parent.
13.     The program serves breast milk that is prepared by the parent, or commercial formula that is mixed and served according to manufacturer’s instructions.
a.     Every effort is made to accommodate the needs of a child who is being breast-fed.
b.     All breast milk or formula is clearly labeled with the child’s name and date of preparation.
c.     Bottles provided by parents are labeled with dates and child’s name.
d.     Heating breast milk and formula and other food items for infants in a microwave oven is prohibited.
14.     Prepared formula or breast milk is used immediately or stored in the refrigerator.  Prepared formula or breast milk is discarded at the end of the day.
a.     Any formula or breast milk remaining in a bottle after feeding is discarded.
b.     If permanent wear bottles and reusable nipples are provided by the program for community use, they are washed and sanitized in a dishwasher where the water temperature is at least 180 degrees F° or boiled for at least five minutes.
15.     If commercial baby food is provided by the parent, it is in the unopened original container.  Any food remaining in the container after feeding is discarded.
16.     Bucket seats and high chairs are used for feeding and are never used during activity time or as a form of restraint.
 
V.     Diapering
1.     Children are changed and diapered regularly and are washed and dried with sanitary, single use cloths or towelettes.
2.     The diaper changing surface is cleaned and sanitized after each use with a disposable towel and disinfectant solution prepared daily (preferably in a spray bottle).
3.     Staff wash their hands thoroughly with liquid soap and warm running water after each diaper change.  It is recommended that staff use disposable latex gloves for diaper changing.  The use of latex/plastic gloves does not eliminate the need for hand washing.
4.     Staff use conveniently located, washable, plastic bag lined and covered receptacles for soiled diapers.
a.     Containers are emptied as often as necessary to eliminate odors and are cleaned and disinfected daily.
b.     The soiled diapers are removed from the building daily.
5.     If cloth diapers are used, the diapers are not rinsed or dumped at the child care program.
a.     Soiled cloth diapers are completely wrapped in a non-permeable material, stored in a location inaccessible to children and given directly to the parent/guardian upon discharge of the child.
b.     The soiled diapers are placed in a covered container away from the children's activity and food service areas and are removed from the program daily.
6.     No child is left unattended during diapering.
 
W.     Toilet Training
1.     Toilet training conforms to an individual plan based on each child's readiness and carried out in conjunction with the parent.
2.     There are no routine attempts to toilet train children under the age of two years.
3.     Potty chairs are not permitted.
 
X.     Pets
1.     All pets maintained on the premises are kept in a safe and sanitary manner and according to state and local requirements.
2.     Children are protected from pets that are potentially dangerous to their health or safety.
3.     Parents are notified of any pets on the premises.
 
Y.     Rest Arrangements for Infants
1.     An iInfant up to eighteen months of age is placed on his/her back while sleeping unless the infant’s primary care provider has completed a signed waiver indicating that the child requires an alternate sleeping arrangement.
2.     Infants are placed for sleep in safe sleep environments, which include a firm crib mattress covered by a tight fitting sheet in a safety approved crib.
3.     Monitors or positioning devices are not used unless required by the child’s primary care provider.
4.     No items are placed in the crib with an infant with the exception of a pacifier.
5.     With written parental approval, toddlers eighteen months and older may have one additional item placed in the crib, such as a favorite blanket, toy or stuffed animal.
 
Z.     Prohibited Practices
1.     Smoking and the use of tobacco products is not permitted in the buildings or outdoor play areas or on grounds within twenty-five feet of buildings.
2.     Smoking in any vehicle used by the program for transporting children is prohibited.
3.     Illegal drugs or alcohol is not used and not permitted in the program.
4.     Guns or weapons of any kind are not permitted in the program.
 
AA.     Physical Activity
1.     Each child care program provides a program of age and developmentally appropriate physical activity.
2.     Children ages twelve months or older attending a full-day program participate in at least sixty minutes of physical activity per day.
3.     Children attending less than a full-day program participate in a proportionate amount of physically active play.
BB.     Screen Time
1.     Screen time is defined as looking at electronic media (including television) with a screen, including watching screens while others use the media.
2.     Television or other screen time is:
a.     prohibited for children under two;
b.     prohibited during meal and snack times (snacks may be provided during occasional group activities);
c.     prohibited when any child in the group is between birth through twenty-three months of age;
d.     limited for all other groups whether teaching staff-directed or a child-selected activity;
e.     limited to thirty minutes or less per day for each child or group;
f.     limited to one hour or less per evening for each child or group in evening or overnight care.
3.     Exceptions to specified time limits include:
a.     electronic media used for children's homework;
b.     e-readers for reading;
c.     smart boards and tablets if used for hands-on learning activities;
d.     electronic media involving physical activity participation; and
e.     occasional group activities, such as watching a movie, provided  that alternate supervised activities remain available to children.
 
III.     ENROLLMENT AND STAFFING
 
A.     Age for Admission
1.     An infant (defined as a child between the ages of birth and eighteen months) is at least six weeks old for admittance to an infant program.
2.     Infants under six weeks of age may never be admitted to an infant program.
3.     A toddler (defined as being between eighteen months and three years of age) is at least eighteen months of age for admittance to a toddler program.
4.     A child is at least three years of age for admittance to a preschool program.
 
B.     Age Integration
1.     Programs operating any combination of child care where age integration takes place meet the more stringent regulations for licensure.
2.     Programs operating both preschool and infant and/or toddler components, where there is no age integration of children as delineated above, do not place any child above or below stipulated age requirements unless written exception is granted by the Department.  A developmental assessment of the child may be required for such placement.
3.     Preschool programs and school age programs may never be combined.
 
C.     Staff/Child Ratio and Maximum Group Size
1.     Programs maintain the following staff to child ratios and maximum group requirements:
AGE
STAFF | CHILD RATIO
MAXIMUM GROUP SIZE
6 weeks to 18 months
1 to 4
8
18 months to 3 years
1 to 6
12
3 years
1 to 9
18
4 years
1 to 10
20
5 years
1 to 12
24
 
2.     The only exception allowed to the above staff/child ratio is during naptime, where there can be one staff per group of napping children.  There are no exceptions to the above requirements for infants (six weeks to eighteen months).
3.     Additional considerations:
a.     Maximum group size is determined by the number of children cared for by a caregiver or group of caregivers in a classroom or designated area.
b.     Physical barriers divide groups and completely separate the children.
c.     Groups may be combined for special activities such as outdoor play, meals, sleeping or field trips.
d.     Staff/child ratios are increased to one to four for swimming and other potentially dangerous activities.
e.     When staff members are functioning in administrative supervisory or support services roles, they do not count in the staff/child ratio.
f.     Programs serving mixed age groupings meet the staff/child ratio and group size requirements for the younger age grouping.
g.     Programs may implement more stringent staff-child ratios if providing inclusive settings for children with disabilities and developmental delays, in consideration of the IEPs or IFSPs for students and/or other special learning, health or social and emotional needs of the children in each classroom.
h.     If the child has an IEP or IFSP, the program works with the school district to support the child’s IEP/IFSP.
 
D.     Night-Time Care
1.     Under no circumstances is a child in care for over twenty-four consecutive hours.
2.     Staff required to meet staff-child ratios is awake at all times.
3.     Staff remains with each group of children at all times.
4.     Emergency lighting devices are installed throughout programs that provide night care.
5.     Sleeping accommodations are restricted to ground floor areas.
6.     Arrangements are made for personal hygiene, including bathing and tooth brushing.
7.     Privacy is ensured for children while they are washing and when they are changing clothes.
8.     In lieu of a head teacher, night care programs may utilize a site coordinator.
 
 
E.     Supervision
1.     Children are under the direct supervision of child care staff at all times.
2.     Designated staff supervises all aspects of the program, including toileting, resting or sleeping, eating and outdoor play.
3.     Supervision is defined as staff present in the room at all times and able to see and hear the children.
 
F.     Staffing Patterns
1.     The grid below represents potential staffing patterns.
2.     Programs may choose any one option listed below within a category consistent with the size of the program(s).
3.     Individuals must meet the credential requirements below to serve in these positions, which are listed in the staff qualifications section of these regulations.
One Classroom
Two to Four Classrooms
5 or more classrooms
Administrator (part time)
Education Coordinator (part time)
Teacher (full-time)
Teacher Assistant (full-time)
Administrator (part time)
Education Coordinator (part time)
Teachers
Teacher Assistants
Administrator (full-time)
Education Coordinator (full-time)
Teachers
Teacher Assistants
Administrator/Education Coordinator (part time in each role)
Teacher (full-time)
Teacher Assistant (full-time)
Administrator/Education Coordinator (part time in each role)
Teachers
Teacher Assistants
Administrator (part time) +
Administrative Assistant (part time)
Education Coordinator (full-time)
Teachers
Teacher Assistants
Administrator (part time)
Education Coordinator/Teacher (full-time)
Teacher Assistant (full-time)
Administrator (part time)
Education Coordinator/Teacher (part time in each role)
Teachers
Teacher Assistants
Administrator/Education  Coordinator (part time in each role)
Teachers
Teacher Assistants
Administrator/Education Coordinator/Teacher (full-time)
Teacher Assistant (full-time)
Administrator/Teacher (part time in each role)
Education Coordinator (part time)
Teachers
Teacher Assistants
 
 
G.     Full-time staff are defined as working in the program for at least thirty hours per week for programs that operate full-day.
 
H.     Group Staffing
1.     Each program has one staff member at the level of teacher for each group of children.
2.     These staff work under the supervision of the education coordinator.
 
I.     Staff Person in Charge
1.     In the absence of the program administrator and the education coordinator, a staff person is designated to be in charge.
2.     This person is knowledgeable in the overall functioning of the program and maintains responsibility for staff supervision during the times that he/ she is in charge.
 
J.     Nurse
1.     Programs serving infants have a nurse on the premises a minimum of three hours per day.
2.     The nurse:
a.     coordinates the depth and scope of health services provided;
b.     participates in the enrollment decision-making process in collaboration with other appropriate staff members;
c.     provides on-site supervision and monitoring of the health status of all infants enrolled in the program;
d.     maintains responsibility for the health records of the children enrolled in the program;
e.     serves as a health consultant to staff and families and is the primary liaison to health consultants and services outside the program;
f.     may function in an additional staff capacity after the duties and responsibilities of the nurse’s role have been discharged; and,
g.     has training in pediatrics and is currently licensed in Rhode Island as a registered nurse or a licensed practical nurse.
3.     The program may choose to hire a child care health consultant in lieu of a nurse in accordance with the American Academy of Pediatrics, Healthy Child Care America.
 
K.     Consultative Medical Services
1.     Programs serving children over eighteen months of age have the consultant services of a licensed physician or registered nurse readily available.
2.     The program has access to such professional services at all times when children are in care.
3.     The program has a letter of understanding to document the availability of these services.
 
L.     Auxiliary Staff
1.     Provisions are made to carry out the necessary clerical, housekeeping, kitchen and maintenance functions needed to ensure the efficient operation of the program.
2.     Child caring staff may perform these functions, but are not counted in the staff/child ratio while doing so.
 
M.     A program whose enrollment exceeds twenty children and which prepares and serves meals employs at least one part-time or full-time food service worker.
 
N.     Volunteers:
1.     Are not counted as staff to meet staff/child ratios.
2.     Are eighteen years of age or older.
3.     Are cleared and approved in accordance with Section V. Employment Background Check Criminal Record and Clearance of Agency Activity Checks.
4.     Receive a formal orientation to program policies and procedures and the volunteer assignment.
5.     Work under the supervision of program staff and are never left alone with children or engage in any disciplinary action with a child.
6.     If a teen volunteer is engaged, an adult supervisor who is physically present at all times closely monitors him/her.
a.     Teen volunteers are at least sixteen years of age.
b.     Programs obtain a signed consent agreement from parent of the teen volunteer stating that he/she approves of the volunteer assignment.
c.     The program has copies of the teen volunteer’s emergency contact information.
d.     The program has a copy of the teen volunteer’s signed school physical form.
7.     A file is maintained for each volunteer.
8.     This file is kept current and contains:
a.     an application for volunteering that includes signing a statement that he or she does not have a criminal record or a communicable disease; and
b.     documentation of the volunteer orientation to the program and the volunteer assignment; and
c.     documentation of understanding that the volunteer must always work under the supervision of program staff and never be left alone with children or engage in any disciplinary action with a child.
 
O.     Staffing Plan
1.     The program has a staffing plan and schedule for each classroom including a list of qualified substitutes.
2.     Two or more staff are on site at all times.
 
P.     Substitutes
1.     The program maintains a list of substitutes who can cover in the event of the absence of staff in order to maintain the required staff-child ratio.
2.     Substitutes meet staff requirements.
3.     Long-term substitutes meet the staff qualifications for the assigned position and are required when a staff member is out for twenty or more consecutive days.
 
IV.     STAFF QUALIFICATIONS AND ONGOING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT REQUIREMENTS
 
A.     Administrator
1.     Each program has a program administrator who is responsible for the overall operation of the program in compliance with these regulations.
2.     The child care program administrator, executive director or education coordinator who meets the following qualifications may assume this role:
a.     Option one: Full-time education coordinator.
i.     Administrator in a program where there is a full-time education coordinator has experience in administration and/or business management.
ii.     Has a minimum of three years of experience working in a licensed/approved early childhood program.
b.     Option two: Part-time education coordinator
i.     Administrator in a program where there is a part-time education coordinator has experience in administration and/or business management;
ii.     Has successfully completed at least eighteen credits in early childhood education and/or child development at the post-secondary level; and
iii.     Has a minimum of three years of experience working in a licensed/approved early childhood program.
 
B.     Education Coordinator
1.     Each program has an education coordinator.  The education coordinator is responsible for:
a.     the implementation of the early learning and development program, including classroom curriculum;
b.     the organization of children’s groups; and
c.     staff performance.
2.     This role may be assumed by the program administrator or teacher who meets the following qualifications:
a.     Option one:  has a current RI Department of Education teacher certification for grades pre-kindergarten to second grade.
b.     Option two:  has a bachelor's or master's degree in a related field such as child development, elementary education or special education and twenty-four credits in early childhood education from an accredited or approved institution of higher education.
c.     Option three:  has a current RI Department of Education teacher certification for early childhood special education, which includes early childhood certification.
3.     The education coordinator has a minimum of three months supervised teaching experience in a licensed/approved early childhood program (student teaching may fulfill this requirement).
 
C.     Teacher
1.     Each group of children has a teacher who works under the supervision and guidance of the education coordinator to care for the children and implement the classroom curriculum.
2.     The teacher meets the following qualifications:
a.     Option one: Has a high school diploma with a vocational concentration in child care that includes two years of supervised experience in an licensed/approved early childhood program;
b.     Option two: Has a high school diploma or a General Education Development (GED) certificate; and
i.     three years of supervised experience in a licensed/ approved early childhood program or certified family day care home; and
ii.     a history of regular participation in an ongoing early childhood staff development program.
 
D.     Each group of children has a teacher’s assistant who is responsible for supporting the teacher in the care and early learning of children, is at least eighteen years old; has a high school diploma or a GED certificate and participates in an ongoing early childhood staff development program.
 
E.     Administrative Assistant
1.     The administrative assistant supports the program administrator in the overall operations in compliance with these regulations.
2.     Has experience in administration or has professional experience in a field appropriate for those who work with young children.
 
F.     Auxiliary Staff Qualifications
1.     The qualifications of staff employed to carry out clerical, housekeeping, kitchen or maintenance functions is consistent with the skills needed to perform the respective job.
2.     Kitchen staff participate in eight hours of training each year related to their position.
G.     When the program employs or uses the services of consultants or other professional staff such as physicians, psychiatrists, social caseworkers, psychologists or nurses, these persons meet the professional standards required by the Rhode Island Department of Health.
 
H.     Orientation
1.     The orientation includes a review of the regulations for licensure and the state law governing child abuse and neglect, as well as program policies, procedures and operations.
2.     All new staff and volunteers are oriented during their first week in the program.
3.     A description of the information covered in the orientation is kept on file for review by the Department representative during monitoring visits.
 
I.     Professional Development
1.     All child caring staff, including the administrator and education coordinator, complete a minimum of twenty hours per year of training aligned with the workforce knowledge and competencies relevant to their role.
2.     The education coordinator, in conjunction with the administrator, is responsible for developing and overseeing an individualized training plan for each staff person.
3.     Training is in areas relevant to the care of young children and is directed towards transferable skills rather than program specific knowledge.
4.     Training may consist of workshops/seminars conducted by recognized professionals in the field, professional conferences, courses at an approved or accredited institution of higher education or comparable professional activities.
 
V.     CRIMINAL RECORD BACKGROUND CHECK(S)AND CLEARANCE OF AGENCY ACTIVITY
 
A.     The program administrator is responsible for ensuring that a criminal record background check and a clearance of agency activity is conducted on all new staff prior to the assignment of child care duties, including consultants, whether full or part-time, in compliance with:
 
B.     Within ten working days of receipt of written notification of disqualifying information, the applicant or staff may appeal the finding in accordance with DCYF Policy 100.0055, Complaints and Hearings.
 
VI.     ADMINISTRATION
 
A.     Program demonstrates fiscal responsibility and stability.
 
B.     Program maintains appropriate insurance for staff, children enrolled, transportation services and physical facilities.
 
C.     Transportation of children complies with DCYF Policy 100.0110, Transportation Safety and adheres to state law and the rules and regulations of the Rhode Island Registry of Motor Vehicles.  Programs providing transportation have written policies regarding the transport of children.
 
D.     Each program develops policies for guiding children's behavior that are given to families and staff.
1.     These policies are based on an understanding of the individual needs and development of the children and assist staff in helping each child to learn and grow.
2.     Policies include prohibited guidance methods.
 
E.     Release of Children
1.     Parents/guardians sign in the child at drop off and sign out the child upon pick up.
2.     Children are only released to the parent or to an individual, eighteen years of age or older, who is authorized by the parent to pick up the child and whose identity can be verified by a proper identification card bearing his/her photograph.
3.     The program develops written policies and procedures regarding the release of children to persons other than the parent.  These policies are given to parents and staff and include:
a.     the procedure for documenting any custody or restraining orders relating to the child;
b.     the procedure for maintaining current written parental authorization for the release of the child to named individuals, which is updated at least annually;
c.     the procedure for verification of identity of authorized individuals, including picture identification;
d.     the procedure for handling emergency call-in authorization by the parent, including verification of the identity of the parent over the phone;
e.     statement that children are not released to an adult under the influence (procedures are established regarding to whom a child should be released in this circumstance).
 
F.     Program Policies and Procedures
1.     The program has written policies and procedures that are given to parents and staff.
2.     Enrollment policy and fee for services are explained to all parents and staff.
3.     Policies and procedures include information on:
a.     child, family and staff orientation programs;
b.     medical emergency and sick child procedures;
c.     classroom management;
d.     calendar, program closing and hours of operation;
e.     schedule of daily activities;
f.     curriculum, goals and philosophy;
g.     program evaluation;
h.     requirements for children's files;
i.     evaluation of children;
j.     supervision of children; and
k.     procedure for reporting cases of child abuse and neglect.
 
G.     Personnel Policies and Procedures
1.     A written statement of personnel policies and procedures is developed and is available to all staff.
2.     This statement is used in the orientation of new staff members and contains the following:
a.     job descriptions and qualifications for employment;
b.     time and procedure for staff evaluation;
c.     employment benefits;
d.     channels for complaints and suggestions;
e.     work day, work week and scheduling of staff;
f.     salary and wage scales;
g.     procedures for disciplinary action and termination; and
h.     staff training.
 
H.     An appropriate system of record-keeping is established; hard copy and/or electronic files are maintained and space is provided within the program for the files to be maintained.
1.     Provision is made for the protection of files and reports as well as for ensuring confidentiality.
2.     An individual file is maintained for each staff.  This file contains:
a.     personal data sheet or application containing the staff’s name, age, home address, phone, education and work experience;
b.     job description;
c.     fingerprinting documentation, results of criminal record check and clearance of agency activity;
d.     notarized employment history and criminal record affidavits;
e.     documentation of employment history verification;
f.     health documents;
g.     attendance record;
h.     staff performance evaluations;
i.     documentation of qualifications;
j.     staff training plan and documentation of participation in staff training; and
k.     statement at time of leaving employment.
3.     A file is maintained on each child.  Parents/guardians have access to their child's file, which is kept current and includes:
a.     an application form completed by the parent/guardian containing the child's name, birth date, parent/guardian's name, current address and phone number and work or school address and phone number;
b.     date of enrollment;
c.     health record, which includes immunization data and physician's record of pre-admission examination;
d.     pertinent social information on the child;
e.     written authorization from the parent/guardian for emergency medical treatment;
f.     written reports of injuries, accidents or illness occurring while the child is in the program and the treatment given;
g.     information pertaining to the child’s progress, growth and development, including IEP information, as relevant;
h.     written authorization from the parent/guardian for the child to participate in and be transported for field trips and other special activities that are not part of the program's daily program; and
i.     names of individuals to whom the child may be released.
4.     In addition to the above information, programs serving infants and toddlers obtain information, in writing, to aid the staff in individualizing the program for each child, including:
a.     developmental and health history;
b.     habits of feeding, foods used and a schedule for introducing new foods;
c.     toilet and diapering habits and procedures;
d.     sleep and napping habits;
e.     child's way of communication and being comforted;
f.     play interests and habits; and
g.     personality and temperament specifics.
 
I.     Program staff work collaboratively with Early Intervention and Special Education providers and in partnership with the family, to support children’s health, safety and early learning and development.
 
J.     The program has a confidentiality policy that requires all staff, consultants and volunteers to maintain confidentiality of child, family and staff information included in files, conversations, observations, meetings, correspondence, social media, cell phones or any other source.
1.     Information contained in a child's file is only released with written authorization from the child's parent/guardian.
2.     The program maintains such authorization on file.
 
K.     At least annually, families, staff and other professionals evaluate the program's effectiveness in meeting the needs of the children.
 
L.     The program does not exceed the licensed capacity at any time.
 
M.     Programs develop and implement a written plan that describes the policy and procedures used to prepare for and respond to emergency or disaster situations.
1.     Emergency planning is individualized to program and hours of operation.
2.     The emergency plan includes procedures for:
a.     serious injuries or illnesses;
b.     suspected child poisonings and known exposure to toxic substances;
c.     outbreaks of infectious diseases, including pandemic influenza;
d.     weather conditions, including tornados, floods, blizzards, hurricanes and ice storms;
e.     fires, including wildfires;
f.     man-made disasters, including chemical and industrial accidents;
g.     human threats, including bomb threats and terrorist attacks;
h.     potentially violent situations in the program, including individuals with threatening behaviors;
i.     lost or abducted children;
j.     utility disruption, including electricity, water and phone; and
k.     other natural or man-made disasters that could create structural damage or pose health hazards.
3.     The emergency plan includes procedures for addressing child needs with additional considerations for children:
a.     two years of age and younger; and/or
b.     with disabilities, developmental delays or chronic medical conditions.
4.     The emergency plan includes procedures for staff to account for each child’s location on a continual basis during emergencies.
5.     The emergency plan includes shelter-in-place procedures for short or extended stay situations that require children to stay in the building, such as tornados and other weather emergencies.
6.     The emergency plan includes lock-down procedures for situations threatening the safety of children and staff, such as shootings, hostages or intruders.  Lock-down procedures include:
a.     notifying staff;
b.     keeping children in designated safe locations in the building;
c.     encouraging children to remain calm and quiet;
d.     securing building entrances; and
e.     ensuring unauthorized individuals do not enter the building.
7.     The emergency plan includes evacuation procedures for situations that require children leave the building, such as a fire.  Evacuation procedures include evacuation routes and pre-determined meeting location(s).
8.     The emergency plan includes relocation procedures for situations that require children move to an alternate location, such as a bomb threat or fire.
 
VII.     CURRICULUM
 
A.     Curriculum
1.     The curriculum clearly demonstrates an understanding of the needs of children and provides for their growth through enriching and stimulating experiences suited to their age levels and stages of development.
2.     The curriculum includes:
a.     developmentally appropriate activities, including daily physical activity;
b.     daily schedule;
c.     classroom environment (and materials);
d.     physical activity;
e.     nurturing relationships; and
f.     family partnerships.
 
B.     Planning
1.     There is a written method of documented planning in each classroom that details classroom plans on a weekly basis and is informed by the Rhode Island Early Learning and Development Standards.
2.     Planning is the responsibility of the education coordinator.
3.     At least once a month, the education coordinator meets with each teacher to consult on program planning and to assist in the planning for individual children.
4.     Classroom teachers share this information with staff and plan for individual children's needs and growth.  Planning includes child-directed activities.
5.     Documentation of planning is kept onsite for at least the previous three months.
 
C.     The program provides a variety of developmentally appropriate activities, guided by the Rhode Island Early Learning and Development Standards.  Activities emphasize concrete experiential learning through play to:
1.     Promote learning through spontaneous and directed play activities.
2.     Enhance each child's unique potential for learning across all developmental domains.
3.     Foster each child’s physical health, development and coordination.
4.     Support each child’s social and emotional development, including trusting relationships with adults.
5.     Support each child’s language development, communication and emergent literacy skills.
6.     Support cognition, executive function and approaches to learning.
 
D.     Daily Schedule (Process)
1.     The infant/toddler program demonstrates an understanding of the needs and development of young children and provides experiences and environments that go beyond basic care and supervision.
2.     The program provides experiences that foster the development of trusting relationships between staff and child(ren).
3.     Programs serving infants make every effort to schedule consistent staff in order to foster and maintain warm, reciprocal relationships between staff and infants.
4.     The program provides an environment that promotes respect for individual feeding, sleeping and diapering patterns.
5.     The physical needs of the children receive prompt attention.
6.     Daily routines of feeding and diapering provide opportunities for learning (e.g. mirrors, mobiles, toys and language input).
7.     The program provides activities that promote on a daily basis:
a.     language acquisition by statements of happenings, songs, stories, poems and finger-plays;
b.     cognitive/sensory learning by stimulation of the senses of sight, hearing, taste, smell and touch;
c.     gross motor skills;
d.     fine motor skills; and
e.     tummy time.
8.     Teachers post and follow a regular daily schedule.  The schedule provides a balance of activities and experiences, which incorporate a combination of activities and are child-initiated and staff-initiated, each day including:
a.     indoor and outdoor;
b.     quiet and active;
c.     large group, small group and individual; and
d.     large muscle and small muscle.
9.     Staff promote children’s active play and participate with children when physically able to do so for at least an hour each day.  The indoor and outdoor environments are utilized for all children to engage in physical activity each day.
10.     Programs provide regular periods of quiet activity or resting/sleeping appropriate to the needs of the children.
11.     Infants and toddlers are in cribs only for rest or sleep.
12.     Preschool children are on cots only for rest or sleep.
13.     There are no restraining devices of any type used in a crib or elsewhere unless prescribed by a physician or other appropriately licensed/certified professional.
14.     The program designates a space separate from the napping area for children who will not sleep to have quiet, supervised play.
15.     There is a sleep plan appropriate to the needs of each child.  There is no forced sleep or wakefulness.
16.     All programs follow a regular daily schedule.  However, planned or routine activities are changed to meet the interests and needs of the children or to cope with weather changes or other situations that effect routines.
 
E.     Classroom Environment and Materials (Context)
1.     All equipment and materials used in the program are:
a.     safe and durable;
b.     appropriate for the age level of the children and stage of development;
c.     sufficient in quantity for the number of children enrolled;
d.     accessible to the children;
e.     promote exploration; and
f.     represent a variety of racial, cultural, linguistic, gender, ability and age attributes.
2.     Materials which require staff supervision are stored out of children's reach.
3.     The indoor and outdoor environments are organized so as to provide the children with ample opportunity for freedom of movement and exploration in safe, clean, open and uncluttered areas.
a.     Non-mobile infants are positioned to permit a wide range of visual stimuli.
b.     Positioning is varied throughout the day.
c.     Ambulatory infants and toddlers are permitted to freely explore a planned environment which provides opportunities to utilize their emerging skills to crawl, climb, pull to a stand and walk.
4.     Materials are provided which stimulate infant development.  A selection of play things are provided including but not limited to:
a.     blocks;
b.     busy boards;
c.     balls;
d.     cuddly toys;
e.     pull toys;
f.     sorting toys;
g.     kitchen toys;
h.     musical and auditory stimulation toys;
i.     nesting and stacking toys;
j.     rattles and squeeze toys;
k.     mirrors;
l.     books;
m.     mobiles and cradle gyms;
n.     climbing equipment; and
o.     riding toys.
5.     The indoor and outdoor environments are organized and equipped with clearly defined learning areas which include, at a minimum, areas devoted to:
a.     construction;
b.     dramatic play;
c.     discovery,
d.     sensory play;
e.     books;
f.     large motor activity;
g.     manipulatives; and
h.     creative expression, including music.
 
F.     Nurturing Relationships (Teaching and Facilitating)
1.     Staff:
a.     serve as a positive role model for the children in care;
b.     use positive methods in guiding children back on task, encourage appropriate behavior and set clear limits;
c.     use rules that children can understand;
d.     match expectations with the children's developing abilities and capabilities;
e.     praise the children's accomplishments as well as their attempts at tasks;
f.     use positive, firm limit setting;
g.     assist children by redirecting them from inappropriate actions to activities that are more favorable;
h.     create a positive environment through their own behaviors such as frequent social conversations with children, joint laughter and affection, eye contact, tone of voice and smiles; and
i.     develop individual relationships with children by providing care that is responsive, attentive, consistent, comforting, supportive and culturally sensitive.
2.     When a child presents challenging behavior, staff:
a.     observe the child;
b.     identify events, activities, interactions and other factors that predict and may contribute to the challenging behavior;
c.     use this information to assist the child;
d.     work together with families on behalf of their child; and
e.     support families in accessing services and outside resources, when necessary.
 
VIII.     FAMILY ENGAGEMENT
 
A.     The program is open to families for observation and visits whenever the program is in operation.
 
B.     Preadmission Family Conference
1.     Are scheduled to secure health and family history, obtain background information on the child and his/her home and develop the child's program.
2.     The completion of these conferences is documented.
3.     Areas of discussion includes:
a.     child’s strengths and needs;
b.     families goals for a child;
c.     family history and background; and
d.     necessary supports and accommodations to ensure the child’s health, safety, early learning and development.
4.     Opportunities are provided for the child and parent to visit the program one or more times before the child is enrolled.
 
C.     Family-Staff Conferences.
1.     The program has a plan for family-staff conferences.
2.     Programs operating infant/toddler programs develop a means of daily communication between staff and families.
3.     Shared information includes: references to the child's mood, health, feeding, sleeping, toileting, playing or other activities, noting changes, disruptions or note-worthy occurrences at home or at the program.
 
D.     Families are kept informed through the parent handbook, regular newsletters, bulletin boards, frequent notes, telephone calls and other communications.
 
E.     The program offers opportunities for the families to be engaged in their child’s early learning and development.  These experiences are informed by the Rhode Island Early Learning and Development Standards and suited to the children’s age and developmental levels.
 
F.     The program maintains a directory of community resources and makes relevant information available to families.
 
G.     Staff work collaboratively with local school districts to ensure that all children have the opportunity to participate in child outreach screening.  Screening is not used to label a child, determine a child’s placement in the program, deny a child’s entrance into a program or to infer a child’s readiness.
 
 
Joint Permanency Committee
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol: 1300.0014
Effective Date:  January 3, 2014
Version: 1
 
 
A.     The Joint Permanency Committee meets regularly to facilitate effective communication and to address barriers to permanency for children and youth in the care of the Department of Children, Youth and Families (hereinafter, the Department).
 
B.     The Joint Permanency Committee is co-chaired by the Chief Judge of the Rhode Island Family Court (hereinafter, the Court) or designee and the Director of the Department or designee.
 
C.     Members of the Joint Permanency Committee include but are not limited to the:
1.     Court and the Department
2.     Office of the Public Defender
3.     Office of the Child Advocate
4.     Court Appointed Special Advocates
5.     Rhode Island Bar Association
6.     Rhode Island Legal Services
 
D.     All members may recommend topics for discussion and consideration which inform the agenda of the Joint Permanency Committee.
 
E.     Each member is expected to share data and information relevant to issues under discussion. 
 
F.     Each member is expected to share information about ideas and approaches under discussion with his/her agency/constituency.  Vehicles for sharing information may include, but are not limited to:
1.     Email;
2.     Memoranda;
3.     Newsletters;
4.     Staff training/supervision;
5.     Policy and protocol development; and
6.     Meetings.
 
G.     Meeting minutes are circulated to all of the members and capture major points of discussion and decision(s) made.
 
H.     To ensure effective internal and external dissemination of each of the Joint Permanency Committee’s decisions, the following methods may be employed:
1.     Policy and/or protocol,
2.     Utilization of identified agency websites,
3.     Supervisory structures,
4.     Regional conferences and meetings,
5.     Formal training, and/or
6.     Any other approach determined by the parties to be necessary and relevant to ensure effective communication of committee decision(s) and/or action(s).
 
 
 
Code of Conduct
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Staff Protocol: 1300.0015
Effective Date:      October 19, 2009
Revised Date: October 23, 2012
Version: 2
 
Preamble
This set of guidelines expresses the fundamental values of Department employees and recognizes the worth, dignity, and uniqueness of all persons as well as their rights and opportunities.  The code intends to be a positive affirmation of exemplary conduct and values. It offers general principles to guide staff conduct and the judicious appraisal of staff conduct in situations that have ethical implications.
Department employees have a responsibility not to allow their own personal problems, psychosocial distress, legal problems, substance abuse or mental health difficulties to interfere with their professional judgment and performance or jeopardize the best interests of those for whom they have a professional responsibility.
Section I.     Integrity and Ethics
Section II.     Professional Conduct
Section III.     Client Services and Privacy
We have a primary obligation to maintain the confidentially of any material regarding our clients, including the identity of the client and to this end:
Section IV.     Use of Electronic mail (email)
Section V.     Accountability to the Governor, General Assembly and Allied Departments and Agencies
DRESS CODE FOR DEPARTMENT STAFF*
 
Each of us represents the state and the department in our various encounters with the public which includes our clients, our community partners and the community at large.  It is incumbent upon all Department staff to dress appropriately for their position while also taking into consideration their planned activities for a given day.  While what you do depends on your position within the agency, there are some generalities that hold for all staff.
The following clothing is not considered business casual:
Jeans; spandex or leggings; T-shirts, strapless, halter, tank or low cut tops; shorts; flip-flop sandals; sneakers (unless permitted by valid medical excuse); clothing with political or ideological writing or pictures or advertising; clothing that exposes parts of body not normally exposed in work setting; sweat pants; sweat shirts, gym clothes
*(Note: This dress code does not cover staff at the Training School for Youth, which will develop its own dress code).
 
 
 
Annual Credit Report for Youth 16 and Older
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Staff Protocol: 1300.0000
Effective Date: October 2, 2012                               Version: 1
 
In compliance with the Child and Family Services Improvement and Innovation Act (Public Law 112-34), the Department of Children, Youth and Families ensures that each child age 16 and older in foster care receives a copy of all consumer credit reports annually until discharged from foster care and is assisted in interpreting the credit report and resolving any inaccuracies.
 
Procedure
 
A.     The Department worker annually contacts all three credit report agencies to determine if youth in care aged 16 or older has a credit report and files the results of the credit checks in the youth’s case record.
1.     Equifax requests that the Department contact one of the following individuals:
a.     Gary Poch – 678-795-7787 or gary.poch@equifax.com
b.     Troy Kubes – 678-795-7777 or troy.kubes@equifax.com
2.     Experian requests that the Department send proof for each person they are requesting a credit report for indicating that the youth is in foster care.
a.     Sensitive information may be redacted from the court order as long as the identification of the minor remains intact.
b.     The primary worker completes DCYF Form #204, Request for Credit Check and mails to:
Experian National Consumer Assistance Center
PO Box 9701 Allen, Texas 75013.
c.     Upon receipt, the NCAC will process the request under the annual free credit report type and send the report back to the Department through regular mail.  For security purposes, the envelope will not indicate Experian.  If there is a report, the account information will be truncated, the Social Security Number for the youth will not appear on the report and any variations of the Social Security Number, will be truncated.
d.     Contact information for questions:
Cathy Jones
Director Regulatory Compliance and Risk Management
Phone: 714 830-7218
Email: cathy.jones@experian.com
Alternate Contact:
Jonathan Sepe
Compliance Specialist Lead
Phone: 714 830-7227
Email: jonathan.sepe@experian.com
3.     TransUnion requests that the Department contact TransUnion directly to obtain credit information:
a.     Angela Harp at 714-680-7268 or aharp@transunion.com
b.     Eric Rosenberg at 312-466-6323 or erosenb@transunion.com
 
B.     If the Department receives confirmation that a youth has been the victim of identity theft, the primary worker contacts the legal department to assist with the fraud resolution process.
REQUEST FOR CREDIT CHECK
 
Date:                Expedia           TransUnion           Experian
 
 Documentation of youth in foster care attached.
 
Name of Youth:
 
Youth’s DOB:_________________________________________________________________
 
Youth’s Current Address:________________________________________________________________
 
Youth’s SSN:___________________________________________________________________
 
 
Previous Address(es) within the last two years:
 
1.______________________________________________________________________
 
2.______________________________________________________________________
 
3.______________________________________________________________________
 
4.______________________________________________________________________
 
5.______________________________________________________________________
 
 
 NO CREDIT REPORT FOUND
 
 CREDIT REPORT FOUND
 
 
PLEASE RETURN TO:
 
Social Worker:________________________________________Phone:___________________
 
Supervisor:___________________________________________Phone:______________
 
Address:________________________________________________________________
 
Related Policy…
Comprehensive Assessment and Service Planning
 
 
 
 
Exclusionary Criteria in the Assignment of a Network Care Coordinator
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol: 1300.0006
Effective Date: November 26, 2013                             
Version: 1
 
A.     Children, youth and families will not automatically be assigned to a Network Care Coordinator/ Family Care Network Family Support Team when:
1.     A medically-fragile child or youth is placed in congregate care;
2.     A child or youth with developmental delays or serious emotional disturbances is placed in congregate care and when no movement of the child or youth is expected in the foreseeable future due to the special needs of the child/youth.
3.     A youth on Probation is placed in a congregate care on the status of Temporary Community Placement and the youth is not
a.     Open to a Family Service Unit (FSU) and/or
b.     Residing in a High End Program or in any out of state program as defined in Department Protocol 1300.0009: Placement into DCYF Designated High End Programs.
4.     A youth is placed at Ocean Tides or NAFI ACE as a Condition of Probation and is not open to FSU.
5.     A youth remains at home and as a condition of Probation/Court Order is receiving a service provided through a Family Care Network, such as MST or EFSS).
6.     A family is open to the Department’s Intake Unit for the provision of a community based service through a Family Care Network when the child remains with the family and the family is both cooperative with services and demonstrates the capacity to navigate and advocate for services on behalf of the child.  If it becomes necessary to assign a Network Care Coordinator/Family Support Team, the family is opened to FSU for support and intervention.
7.     The family is open to FSU and the child/youth resides in a placement that is not part of a Family Care Network (including generic foster care or kinship care) and the family is receiving a Family Care Network community-based service.
 
B.     A family meeting criteria listed in Paragraph A may be referred to a Network Care Coordinator/Family Support Team if appropriate.  If such a referral is considered, the Department’s primary worker confers with his/her supervisor and/or administrator.
 
 
Department - Network Funded Services
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol: 1300.0007
Effective Date: January 28, 2013                                       
Version: 1
 
Department of Children, Youth and Family (hereinafter, Department) staff utilize 005 funding only as a last resort.  Where Neighborhood Health Plan/Beacon is a source for payment of medical and behavioral health care, these resources are utilized first.
 
A family is involved in the Network when at least one child is in either residential placement, a group home or treatment foster care.  Flex funds may continue to be used to support/sustain reunification once the child has returned home.
 
A youth referred to the Network only for Community-Based Support Services will only receive the community-based support service as a Network service.  Flex funds are not used in a referral as a condition of probation or referral to prevent placement for a youth active with Department and living at home
 
When Family Court orders the Department to make Juvenile Justice Referrals for services, the Networks will process referrals to Ocean Tides, Boys Town, and/or NAFI ACE, as well as any other appropriate residential programs that the Network or Department’s primary worker recommends.  The Network and Department’s primary worker can also recommend referrals for Community-Based Support Services. 
 
RITS Home-Based Initiative is a Family/Youth assessment to determine the viability of home as an alternative to placement.  When a youth is detained at the Rhode Island Training School (RITS) with a Court order for referrals to placement and the youth is not open to Probation or a Family Service Unit (FSU), the RITS primary worker must include a request for the Home-Based Initiative assessment when requesting a Network to look into placement options.  If a youth is open to Probation or FSU, this initiative would be requested as needed.
 
Medical-Behavioral Health
 
Network Involved
 
Non-Network Involved
Doctor/Dental Visits and Treatment Needs
Network or rendering provider will bill NHP/Beacon
 
If child is undocumented, or NHP/Beacon is not applicable, Department will authorize 005 expenditure as last resort
Department uses NHP/Beacon
 
 
Same
Mental health,
Substance abuse,
Sexual abuse evaluations and treatment
 
Network or rendering provider will bill NHP/Beacon. 
o     NHP/Beacon covers Parent-Child Evaluations and Child Sex Abuse Evaluations.
 
If NHP/Beacon is not applicable and if service is not part of a Network  provider program, Department will authorize 005  expenditure as last resort.
 
Department pays for adults involved with Networks, if active on Child Welfare petition.  If child is active only through Probation, Department does not pay for adults’ treatment.
Department uses NHP/Beacon.   NHP/Beacon covers Parent-Child Evaluations and Child Sex Abuse Evaluations.
 
 
If NHP/Beacon is not applicable, Department authorizes 005 expenditure
 
Department pays for adults, if child is active on a Child Welfare petition.  If child is active only through Probation, Department does not pay for adult treatment. 
Blood Drug/Alcohol Screening
Network or rendering provider will bill NHP/Beacon
 
If NHP/Beacon is not applicable, Department authorizes 005 expenditure as last resort
Department uses NHP/Beacon
Family therapy with Child and without Child
 
Network or rendering provider will bill NHP/Beacon
 
If NHP/Beacon is not applicable and if service is not part of a Network provider program, Department authorizes 005 expenditure as last resort
 
Department pays for adults involved with Networks, if child is active on Child Welfare petition. 
Department uses NHP/Beacon
 
If NHP/Beacon is not applicable, Department authorizes 005 expenditure
 
Department pays for adults if child is active through Child Welfare petition.  Not if child is Probation only.
DAS Outpatient Licensed Clinician – Masters Level and Psychologist
Department authorizes 005 for DAS evaluations
Department authorizes 005 for DAS evaluations
Co-Payments for Counseling
Where necessary, Department authorizes 005 
 
Department authorizes 005
 
Co-Payments for Medical Visits
 Where necessary, Department authorizes 005
Department authorizes 005 
 
Ambulance
Department authorizes 005
Department authorizes 005
Hospital – Medical
Hospital – Psychiatric
Department authorizes 005
Department authorizes 005
Department authorizes 005
Department authorizes 005
Pharmacy
 
Department pays for adults in Networks, if child is active through Child Welfare petition.
 
Department pays for Non-Network families and for adults in Networks, if child is active through Child Welfare petition.
Physician Medication Management
 
RNP-NCS Medication Management
 
Department pays for adults in Networks if child is active on Child Welfare petition.
 
 
 
Department does not pay for adults if child is active only through Probation.
Department pays for Non-Network involved families and for adults in Networks if child is active on Child Welfare petition.
 
Department does not pay for adults if youth is active only through Probation.
Respite
 
Network uses flex funds if placement is within Network(s)
Department authorizes 005 as last resort if generic foster home is used.
Department authorizes 005
 
Network Placement Support
Network Involved
Non-Network Involved
One to One Supervision
Applies to children in residential, group home or treatment foster care.   Network uses Residential Support Funds
N/A
Nursing/Medical Support
NHP/Beacon or Residential Support Funds
N/A
Housing Support
 
Network Involved
Non-Network Involved
Rent/Security Deposit
Food
 
Network uses flex funds to provide housing support for the primary caretaker for youth/family where at least one child is in residential placement in the Network –   Rent/Security Deposit.
·     Initial deposit for child living independently not involved in YESS program
Department authorizes 005 for first month’s rent/security deposit only when it is the last barrier to reunification.
 
Electric Utility
Gas Utility
Oil Utility
Furniture
 
Network helps family access utility housing support and assistance with furniture needs through appropriate resources available in the community; e.g., Community Action Programs.  Network may use flex funds to assist if deemed necessary.
 
Department helps families to access needed assistance through Community Action Programs. 
 
Department may authorize 005s for utility support or furniture based on family/case circumstances. 
Clothing
Network Involved
Non-Network Involved
Clothing – Miscellaneous
Clothing – 0-3 years old
Clothing – 4-11 years old
Clothing – 12+ years old
Provided through Network program provider rates and, where necessary, Network flex funds
 
DCYF authorizes 005
 
Transportation
 
Network Involved
Non-Network Involved
 
Network uses flex funds to support transportation needs for  children in placement; e.g., bus passes
Department authorizes 005s for bus passes for parents when necessary
Department authorizes 005 expenditure for child.Department authorizes 005 of parent if child is active on Child Welfare petition.  Not if child is active only through Probation.
Interpreter Services
Network Involved
Non-Network Involved
Includes language translation and sign language.
Department provides interpreter service for the initial contact of a child/family coming into care and any meetings with family for DCYF purposes (i.e., investigation, monthly face to face).
 
The Networks provide for interpreter services as needed thereafter; e.g., team meetings, provision of services, home visits, etc.
 
Department uses Language Bank services
Educational Support
Network Involved
Non-Network Involved
Educational Materials
Educational Programs
Parent Aide
Parent Aide – Specialized
Parent Aide Education- Specialized
Parent Education w/child care
Network uses flex funds to support educational material and programs and other activities such as:
1)     Unfunded summer school
2)     Tutoring
3)     Scholastic Aptitude Tests (SATs)
4)     Non-Tuition Vocational Support (that are not funded through another source)
 
Department authorizes 005 expenditure for all Parent Aide services
Department authorizes 005 expenditure for educational activities, or waivers have been exhausted.
 
DCYF authorizes 005 expenditure for all Parent Aide services.
 
Enrichment Programs
 
Network Involved
 
Non-Network Involved
Including, but not limited to:
 
Specialty camps
YM/WCA Memberships
Karate classes
Horseback riding
After school sports
 
Networks use flex funds for family, youth, child to support child and family well-being. 
 
DCYF authorizes 005, if necessary when all other funding sources or waivers have been exhausted.
 
Other Community Support
 
Network Involved
 
Non-Network Involved
Restorative Justice:  to assist adjudicated juveniles in placement, where appropriate, to have the means to make necessary restitution and/or provide community services as a condition of having their placement (juvenile court order) ended.
 
Miscellaneous
Networks use flex funds
N/A
Other DEPARTMENT Expense Authorizations
Network Involved
Non-Network Involved
Legal Subsidy
Adoption - Non Recurring Expenses
Guardianship - Non Recurring Expenses
Non-Medicaid Medical Expenses
Paternity Testing - Lab Corp
Funeral Expenses
 
Department authorizes 005
Department authorizes 005
Community-Based Services Funded By Network 
 
Network Involved
Non-Network Involved
Enhanced Family Support Services
Family Preservation
Multi-Systemic Therapy
Outreach and Tracking
Visitation Center
Preserving Family Networks
 
Community-based services would be used to transition and maintain a child in a residential placement back to home/community or to lesser level of care; e.g., foster home. 
 
A sibling(s) at home may receive community-based services. 
 
When a child/youth is not in a Network, but in need of one of the Network funded community-based services, the child/youth must be referred to the Network for the services.
 
Department authorizes 005 for any additional services needed for the youth beyond the community-based service.
Funded By DEPARTMENT
Network Involved
Non-Network Involved
Parenting with Love and Limits
Department funds Parenting with Love and Limits to support youth transitioning from residential programs (primarily NAFI residential).
 
 
 
Day Care
 
Network Involved
 
Non-Network Involved
Day Care Center – Infant/Toddler
Day Care Center – Pre-school
Day Care Center – School age
Day Care GH – Infant/Toddler
Day Care GH – Pre-school
Day Care GH – School age
Day Care Home – Infant/Toddler
Day Care Home – Pre-school
Department funds day care through 005 for working foster parents
All day care is funded with Department 005 for working foster parents
 
 
 
Medical Examinations for Youth Served by a Family Care Network who have been AWOL
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol: 1300.0008
Effective Date: August 26, 2013                             
Version: 1
 
A.     If a youth returns from AWOL and does not suffer from a chronic medical condition or does not disclose or exhibit any evidence of illness or recent substance use, then that youth may be placed into an identified network placement prior to a medical examination being conducted.
1.     These youth are not examined at walk-in medical centers for a medical examination prior to returning to placement.
2.     An appointment for a comprehensive physical examination for the following business day. This examination is conducted by the youth’s primary physician, a pediatric Emergency Room, or the PANDA Clinic as appropriate.
3.     Examination includes screening for pregnancy and/or any other diagnostic screens related to any at-risk behavior.
4.     The network placement provider obtains the examination for the youth who does not require an immediate medical examination prior to placement.
 
B.     If a youth returning from AWOL has a chronic medical condition or discloses or exhibits signs of illness or recent substance use, an emergency medical examination must be obtained prior to the youth returning to a placement.
1.     This medical e examination is performed at a location that can best meet the youth’s needs given the urgency of the youth’s presenting condition, the information disclosed and/or the time of day.
2.     If a youth returns from AWOL within four days and requires an immediate medical examination prior to placement, the network placement provider partner is responsible for having the youth evaluated medically unless alternate arrangements are made with DCYF.
3.     If a youth has been AWOL for longer than four days and requires an immediate medical examination prior to placement, the Department’s primary worker obtains the medical examination. Network intake staff should be contacted first to arrange for placement whenever a youth returns from AWOL, whether or not the AWOL episode lasted more than four days.
 
 
Placement into DCYF Designated High End Programs
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol: 1300.0009
Effective Date:  October 21, 2013                             
Version: 1
 
A.     Prior Departmental Executive Staff approval is required for placement of a child or youth into any of the following High End Programs:
1.     Any out-of-state residential placements;
2.     Harmony Hill (any programs);
3.     St. Mary’s Horton and Mauran Units;
4.     Groden group homes;
5.     Perspectives group homes; and
6.     Bradley group homes.
 
B.     The Department’s division of Community Services and Behavioral Health (hereinafter, CSBH) network care managers support the high end placement process and ensure that children and youth are served in the least restrictive setting that will promote safety, permanency and well being. Network care managers:
1.     Review referral packets for children and youth identified by Department staff as potentially needing placement in high end programs.
2.     Routinely discuss potential high end placements with the assigned Family Care Network.
3.     Participate in Family Team Meetings for children/youth who may be placed in a high end program and
a.     Assist the Team when children, youth and families present with complex needs; and
b.     Help in developing plans and interventions that are individualized, family-focused and community-based. 
4.     Review formal requests from the Family Care Network for placements in high end programs.
a.     These formal requests from the Family Care Network must identify youth treatment needs;
b.     Other options that have been explored;
c.     The reasons why less restrictive alternatives are not appropriate;
d.     Whether the full Family Team is in agreement; and
e.     The anticipated length of stay in the program.
5.     Obtain Department executive approval for high end placements.
6.     Secure Local Education Agency (hereinafter, LEA) approval to pay average per pupil special education costs for a high end program identified in Paragraph B.
7.     Follow up with the Family Care Network regarding youth who are in the hospital or at ARTS, especially youth placed on administrative status.
8.     Participate in intake-related SMART meetings and additional regional or targeted case reviews.
9.     Provide guidance to Department staff on services for children and youth experiencing complex clinical needs.
10.     At the discretion of the network care manager and CSBH administrator, remain involved with a child or youth with complex clinical needs following a high end placement.
11.     Participate in Utilization Management process for children/youth in high end placements as needed.
 
C.     Network care managers become involved with a potential referral of a child or youth to a High End Program (see list in Paragraph A) when:
1.     The assigned Family Care Network notifies the network care manager that a high end program may be required. Notification may occur when the initial network referral packet is received or at any point thereafter.
2.     A Regional Director, the Probation or RI Training School administrator indicates in a network referral packet that a high end program may be required;
3.     Department staff requests network care manager involvement when they feel a youth’s needs may necessitate high end placement or when network care manager expertise with the available service array may be helpful; or
4.     A regional or targeted case review identifies the need for network care manager involvement.  Additional times when a network care manager is consulted include, but are not limited to a:
a.     Court order has been issued or is likely to be issued for high end referrals or placement; and/or
b.     Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) or the Office of the Child Advocate (OCA) has requested or recommended high end referrals or placement; and/or
c.     Service provider or family has recommended high end placement;
d.     Family has requested a Voluntary Placement and a high end placement is possible; and/or
e.     Utilization Management review, facility safety review, Continuous Quality Improvement/Medicaid review or other review of child or youth needs and success with current services indicate that a high end placement may be needed.
 
D.     When the potential need for a high end placement is identified:
1.     The network care manager reviews the network referral packet kept in the CSBH and relevant information in RICHIST regarding child and family history, service needs and strengths.
2.     Network staff consult with the network care manager and have a full, informed discussion of:
a.     possible placements, including high end and less restrictive settings;
b.     child/youth’s presenting needs;
c.     safety and risk factors;
d.     child/youth strengths;
e.     placement history;
f.     educational requirements;
g.     anticipated length of stay; and
h.     future step-down options.
3.     The Family Care Network shares all available information regarding the child/ youth with the network care manager, including but not limited to recent evaluations or reports from service providers.
4.     Network staff and the network care manager brainstorm and agree upon preferred placement options with an emphasis on the least restrictive setting possible that promotes safety, permanency and well-being.
5.     Network staff enter a case activity note in RICHIST documenting the discussion with the network care manager.
6.     The network care manager enters a note in RICHIST documenting his/her discussion with the network staff person.
 
E.     Following the discussion with network staff, the network care manager discusses with the Department’s primary worker or supervisor the potential placement options identified.
1.     Network care manager confirms and communicates back to the Family Care Network that these options have been discussed with the primary worker or supervisor and are consistent with what the primary worker or supervisor feels is necessary.
2.     Of importance: discussion between the network care manager and the primary worker or supervisor does not ever take the place of direct conversation between network staff and the Department’s primary worker or supervisor regarding planning and placement options.
 
F.     The network care coordinator (NCC) invites the network care manager to any scheduled family team meetings or other planning meetings (e.g., hospital meetings, provider meetings) held for children who may be placed in a high end program. If no NCC is assigned, the convener of the meeting (e.g., network staff, Department’s primary worker, etc.) invites the network care manager.
 
G.     Except in an emergency, a Family Team Meetings is held prior to any referral and/or placement.  Network care managers:
1.     Participate in family team meetings to offer input on placement options or other services that needed by a child, youth or family.
2.     Attend family team meetings and other planning meetings to obtain additional information on youth and family dynamics, behaviors, strengths and needs.
 
H.     Referrals are sent to programs based upon joint agreement among the Department’s primary worker and the network care manager, the assigned network and the family team.
 
I.     Once a youth is accepted to a specific high end placement and a family team identifies that this placement is the best option to meet the youth’s needs in the least restrictive setting possible, the Family Care Network formally requests Department executive approval for the placement.
1.     The network contacts the assigned network care manager to make the request.
2.     The network care manager reviews the request with CSBH administration and presents the request to the Department’s Deputy Director or designee with the following information:
a.     the safety and treatment needs that warrant the high end placement;
b.     why a less restrictive placement is not possible;
c.     the anticipated length of stay is; and
d.     whether LEA approval is needed and has been granted.
 
J.     If high end placement is approved by the DCYF deputy director or designee, the network care manager communicates the approval immediately to the assigned Family Care Network and Department staff via email. The network care manager also produces an approval letter to be signed by the Department’s Deputy Director and provided to the Family Care Network.
 
K.     The network care manager secures approval for average per pupil education costs prior to any placement occurring into a facility with a non-district, onsite educational program.
1.     This includes:
a.     All out-of-state placements
b.     Harmony Hill (all programs)
c.     St. Mary’s Horton and Mauran Units
2.     In order to secure the LEA average per pupil education funding for a program:
a.     The child/youth must be registered at the last known address of the parent/guardian within that LEA; and
b.     be accepted by the program.
c.     In order for special education funding to be secured, the youth must have a current, valid Individual Education Plan (IEP).
3.     Once a high end placement is recommended by the Department and the involved network and the IEP (if applicable) is verified, the network care manager sends the approved protocol letter to the LEA.
4.     To facilitate LEA approval for education costs, it is extremely important that the LEA be invited by the Family Care Network to any family team meetings at the earliest point and be continuously apprised of planning for a high end placement.
5.     The LEA may request additional information to be provided by the parent/ guardian or the primary worker.
6.     Once the LEA has all necessary information, it notifies the network care manager in writing of the decision.
a.     If the LEA approves, the network care manager provides a copy of this notification to the assigned Family Care Network and the Department’s primary worker.
b.     If the LEA refuses financial responsibility, the network care manager initiates a consultation with the Department’s legal staff as to whether a hearing should be pursued through the Rhode Island Department of Education (RIDE).
7.     Placement into a high end program without LEA acceptance of educational responsibility and assurance that the average per pupil education cost will be paid can only be made with the specific approval of the Department’s Deputy director or designee.
8.     If the LEA changes during a high end placement, the department primary worker notifies the network care manager.
 
Youth on Temporary Community Placement -
Placement Disruption
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Staff Protocol: 1300.0010
Effective Date: October 23, 2012                             
Version: 1
 
Staff within the Division of Juvenile Correction Services adheres to the following protocol in the event of a placement disruption for a youth on temporary community based placement status to ensure proper notification and authorization of any change in a youth’s community placement.
 
A.     Placement Disruption of youth supervised by DCYF Juvenile Probation during business hours:
1     Residential programs contact the Probation Officer/Supervisor regarding any placement issues, including any change of operations and/or need to relocate the youth within their program.  Upon receipt of such notification, the Probation Officer will:
a     Confirm whether the youth is on TCP Status.
b     Inform the program that no final placement plans are made until matter is addressed in Family Court; however, placement alternatives are explored immediately after status is confirmed.
c     Immediately contact his/her supervisor and probation administrator.
d     Notify the Attorney General’s office and youth's attorney and inform parties that the Department will bring the matter before the Family Court that day.
e     Bring the issue before the Family Court that day.
1     The Probation Officer/Supervisor presents the case to the Family Court; due to time constraints the issue may be presented verbally and followed up by a Court Letter.  The presentation to the Court includes: the reason the placement change is requested (i.e. structural issues, loss of heat etc), the availability of residential alternatives and/or whether the youth should be remanded.
1     Probation officer/supervisor implements the orders of the Family Court.
 
B.     Placement Disruption of youth supervised by DCYF Juvenile Probation after normal business hours.
1     Residential agencies contact CPS and the Shift Coordinator’s Office at the RITS when a youth goes AWOL from program after hours or when there is any kind of after hours placement disruption.  The agency notifies the CPS and the Shift Coordinator’s Office if the youth is on temporary community placement status.  Staff assigned to the Shift Coordinator’s Office confirm if the youth in question is on TCP Status.  If such status is verified the Shift Coordinator:
a     Informs the program that no alternative placement is made until the Department obtains approval from the Family Court. The provider explores alternative placement options on behalf of the youth.
b     Contacts the Administrator on Call (AOC) at the RITS to inform the administrator of the situation, including the availability of any placement options to accommodate the youth’s needs.
c     E-mails the Probation Administrator regarding the current placement disruption issue.
1     The AOC at the RITS contacts the On Call Judge/Magistrate with any available alternative placement options and requests authorization to either place the youth in an alternative placement or have the youth returned to the Training School.
1     The AOC relays the orders of the Duty Judge /Magistrate and either implements the TCP retrieval process or directs the provider to facilitate placement in an alternative community based program as authorized by the Duty Judge/ Magistrate.
1     The Office of the Shift Coordinator notifies the Probation Officer and Probation Supervisor by e-mail of the emergency court order.
1     The Probation Officer/Supervisor notifies the Attorney General’s office and youth's attorney that the Department will bring the matter before the Family Court the next day.
1     The Probation Officer/Supervisor brings the matter before the Family Court the next business day.
1     The Probation Officer/Supervisor presents the case to the Family Court; due to time constraints the issue may be presented verbally and followed up by a Court Letter.  The presentation to the Court includes: the reason for the disruption of placement (i.e. structural issues, loss of heat etc) and the content of the orders from the duty judge from the previous day.
1     Probation Officer/Supervisor implements the orders of the Family Court.
 
 
Safeguards in the Management of Protected Health Information
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol: 1300.0016
Effective Date:  January 3, 2014                             
Version: 1
 
The Department of Children, Youth and Families (hereinafter, the Department) is a covered entity as defined by the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (hereinafter, HIPAA), and is committed to safeguarding all citizen’s and client’s Protected Health Information in any format, including electronic/computerized modalities.  This protocol supports a culture of compliance in the management of all Protected Health Information by any staff of the Department.
 
Procedure
 
A.     HIPAA, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act passed by Congress in 1996, requires a culture of compliance in the careful handling of Protected Health Information (PHI) and Personally Identifiable Information (PII).  As a HIPAA covered entity, DCYF and its staff must abide by the regulations of this federal act at all times.
1.     PHI relates to information relates to an individual’s health/behavioral health, provisions of health/behavioral health care and/or payment for such care.
2.     Personally Identifiable Information (PII) refers to Protected Health Information (PHI) that can be linked to a particular person.
3.     Common individual identifiers of protected health information include but are not limited to names, social security numbers, addresses and birth dates.
4.     A single identifier, such as a full name, that is associated with a Department program may be considered PHI/PII. Information may be considered PHI/PII even if a Social Security Number or a unique health plan number is not included.
5.     Department staff safeguard PHI/PII that is individually identifiable as described in this protocol.  Staff use the "Need to Know" standard in sharing PHI/PII
a.     It is used or disclosed only as necessary to perform job duties.
b.     Accessing or disclosing recipient/consumer/client/resident/patient information for purposes other than to perform job duties is prohibited.
c.     Staff are prohibited from accessing or disclosing PHI/PII from State information systems regarding relatives, co-workers or acquaintances unless it is necessary to perform the job function.
6.     The Department maintains Business Associate Agreements with all entities with whom PHI/PII may be shared to ensure all communications, transactions and interactions are HIPAA compliant.  The Department has HIPAA compliant Business Associate Agreements with the Family Care Networks, as well as other service providers and entities with which PHI/PII is shared in the performance of official business on a “Need to Know” basis.
7.     Any questions are directed to the Department’s Privacy Officer, Kevin Aucoin, and/or the Department’s Security Officer, David Allenson.
 
B.     Staff utilize unique passwords for any state account with access to PHI.
1.     Passwords are never shared with other users or any other individual and are never the same for state and personal/private accounts.
2.     Staff do not utilize sticky notes or other non-secure methods to display or store user names and/or passwords.
3.     Staff do not provide a password within an email message or over the telephone. (DoIT may occasionally ask to staff to reset a password over the phone to resolve a problem, but will not request a current password over the phone or in an email. Such requests are often from unauthorized sources/individuals trying to gain illegal access to PHI.
 
C.     Any email going outside the state email network that contains Personal Health Information (PHI) or Personally Identifiable Information (PII) must be sent using an encryption (i.e., [Send Secure]). Staff:
1.     Avoid sending email containing PHI to an email distribution list without prior confirmation that everyone on the list needs to know the information.
2.     Use the Minimum Necessary Standard when emailing, sending attachments or transferring files that contain PHI.
a.     PHI is disclosed when it is necessary to satisfy a particular purpose or carry out a function. PHI is not used or disclosed if not necessary to satisfy a purpose or carry out a function. For example, if an authorized person requests a specific individual assessment, staff provide that assessment; staff do not provide the individual's entire record.
b.     Staff are careful to not to utilize potential identifiers unless necessary and such identifiers are never used in the subject line of an email.
3.     Do not configure State email software to automatically forward to a non-State email address.
4.     Include this approved DCYF/OHHS confidentiality statement in every email:  "This message and all attachments are confidential or proprietary to DCYF/ OHHS, and disclosures, or distribution to anyone other than the intended recipient without the prior written permission of DCYF/OHHS is prohibited.  This message and any attachments may contain confidential health information that is protected by law.  This information is intended only for the use of the individual or entity names above. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, or distribution is prohibited.  If you think you have received this message in error, please notify the sender by replying to the e-mail and delete the message without disclosure."
 
D.     The Department posts a HIPAA compliant Privacy Statement on the DCYF internet site. 
1.     Supervisors and administrators distribute the Department’s Privacy Statement to respective staff.
2.     In accordance with HIPPA requirements, staff provide the Department’s clients (parents/guardians/youth aged 18 or older) with a copy of the Department’s Privacy Statement at the initial meeting. 
3.     Staff ensure that each youth aged 18 or older/parent/caregiver signs the acknowledgement of receipt of a copy of the Department’s Privacy Statement and places the original in the Department's hard copy case record. 
 
E.     Staff comply at all times with Department Policy and with Division of Information Technology (DoIT) Acceptable Use Policy in utilizing any computer or electronic management information system.
1.     The exchange (receipt or distribution) of any PHI or PII that is not on a secured/ encrypted device (thumb drive) or secured/encrypted media is strictly prohibited.
2.     Connecting non-State owned flash drives/thumb drives/memory cards/USB drives or other electronic portable storage devices to State owned computers is strictly prohibited even if the device does not contain PHI.
3.     All State owned laptops are encrypted using DoIT encryption software.
4.     Staff are strictly prohibited from saving/transferring/uploading/downloading PHI (even temporarily) to or from any non-State owned computer, laptop, tablet, phone or other personal processing device.
5.     When working with PHI, the only authorized methods to work from home or a remote location are to either use a State owned encrypted device or connect to the network using the State's Virtual Private Network (VPN) connection.
a.     Non-state owned devices may be used for viewing and sending email via GroupWise "WebAccess" or to connect to the State network via the State's VPN only if no PHI is saved on the non-State owned device.
b.     When a non-State owned or any unencrypted device is used to view email, staff avoid opening attachments that may contain PHI since the attachments may be saved to a temporary location on the device.
6.     Staff that view email from any non-state owned device (including but not limited to computers, laptops, tablets and phones) must configure the device to prompt for an email password each time the device logs into the State email server.
7.     Storing State email passwords on non-state owned devices is prohibited because it can allow unauthorized people to easily gain access to PHI.
8.     Staff are prohibited from emailing PHI to a personal/home/non-work related email account (such as email addresses that end with @Yahoo.com, @Hotmail.com, @Cox.net, @Verizon.com, @AOL.com, @Gmail.com, etc.).
 
F.     Staff are prohibited from accessing/creating/posting/saving/transferring/uploading/ downloading PHI to or from any:
1.     Non-State internet-based file storage service such as Dropbox, Skydrive, Google Drive, etc.
2.     Non-State internet-based productivity software service such as Google Docs, Microsoft Office Web Apps, OpenOffice, Adobe Buzzword, etc.
3.     Internet-based Social Networking sites such as Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, Google Plus, Instagram, etc.
4.     Use of text messages or text messaging services.
 
G.     Hard copy documents must not be left unsecured in the work place as per HIPAA regulations and Department policy.
 
H.     Staff that have been issued a State cellular phone configure it to use an alphanumeric password/passkey consisting of at least four characters.
 
Staff notify the Department’s HIPAA Privacy Officer (Kevin Aucoin), immediately of any breach or potential breach of PHI/PII. A breach means the acquisition, access, use, or disclosure of PHI/PII in a manner which compromises the security or privacy of PHI/PII.
 
Related Policies...
DCYF Policy 100.0000, Confidentiality
DCYF Policy 100.0005, Confidentiality: Access to Information Contained in Departmental Service Records
DCYF Policy 100.0010, Confidentiality: Access to Restricted Information
DCYF Policy 100.0015, Confidentiality: Access to Computerized Information Maintained by the Department
DCYF Policy 100.0020, Confidentiality: Access to Information Contained in Licensing Records
DCYF Policy 100.0025, Confidential Information Requests Received Through Masterfile
DCYF Policy 100.0160, Code of Ethics
DCYF Policy 100.0195, Computer Use
DCYF Policy 500.0045, Requests for Confidential Information Received Through the Call Floor
DCYF Policy 700.0065,  Contents and Format for Departmental Record Keeping
 
 
 
Peer Support Team
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Staff Directive: 1300.0019
Effective Date:  September 22, 2014                    Version 1
 
The Department of Children, Youth and Families (hereinafter, the Department) recognizes the incidental or cumulative critical incident stress experienced by staff in the performance of their jobs. Through its ongoing commitment to ensure the long-term emotional health of its staff, the Department has implemented stress prevention and education programs, including a Peer Support Team (hereinafter, PST).  The PST provides confidential staff assistance. The service is voluntary and also can be mobilized in the event of a critical incident.  Department staff serving as members of the PST receive training and consultation in providing education, support and referral services.
 
The PST is purely a voluntary peer support model, which allows Department staff to help staff, but which does not provide clinical assistance.  To this end, the PST is available to respond to and assist staff involved in critical incidents or staff in need of assistance as a result of any stress related incident(s). With the exceptions noted in this protocol below, meetings and interactions are held in confidence. Participants are reminded of the confidential nature and exceptions to the PST at the beginning of each and every meeting, debriefing and/or defusing. With the exceptions noted in this protocol below, the PST’s confidentiality will be respected by the Department; PST members will not be called by the Department to testify at administrative or disciplinary proceedings against staff.
 
 
Related Policy
Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect
Standards for Investigating Child Abuse and Neglect (CA/N) Reports (Levels 1, 2, 3)
Suspension of Employees Driver's License
 
 
Related Protocol
Code of Conduct
 
 
Definitions:
 
Critical Incident:  Any incident that has a high emotional impact on the responders; or is beyond the realm of a person's usual experience that overwhelms his/her sense of vulnerability and/or lack of control over the situation.
 
Critical Incident Stress:  A normal reaction(s) to an abnormal event.
 
Defusing:  A brief, confidential discussion between and focusing on staff(s) involved in a critical incident and PST staff immediately following the incident to restore the staff(s) cognitive functioning and prepare him/her for future, related stress reactions.
 
Debriefing:  A closed, confidential discussion of a critical incident relating to the feelings and perceptions of those directly involved prior to, during and after a stressful event. It is intended to provide support, education and an outlet for associated views and feelings. Debriefings do not provide counseling or an operational critique of the incident.
 
Employee Assistance Program (EAP):  Department staff, dependents and household members can receive free confidential assistance with personal and job-related problems through the EAP, a benefit provided by the state.
 
Mental Health Professional:  is an individual approved by the Department Director (or designee) and licensed by the RI Department of Health, who, operating within the scope of approved practice, provides consultation and assistance to the PST as needed; such assistance may include but is not limited to participating in debriefings and in final decisions on whether or not further counseling is needed by staff.
 
Sick Leave:  Leave granted for personal illness and or injury.
 
 
Protocol
 
A.     The PST is comprised of selected department staff who received specialized peer support and critical incident response training to recognize and understand related stress reactions.
1.     All PST members agree to volunteer their time and the Department agrees to allow staff to participate.
2.     Peer Support Co-Leaders are the lead PST staff and determine, within the parameters of this protocol and Department policy, when and how the PST is utilized.
3.     The PST holds monthly meetings to assist members of the PST in functioning as peer supports, to develop the team process and to support the team members.
 
B.     Any statement or discussion with PST staff while acting in his/her peer support role remains confidential.  PST staff maintain strict confidentiality in matters discussed in peer defusings, debriefings or support meetings. Because members of the PST are also Department staff, they are bound under state and federal law and regulation to report certain incidents if they are divulged or observed. These exceptions to the confidentiality require PST staff to report:
1.     When failure to disclose such information would present a clear and present danger  to self or others;
2.     Any incident of child abuse or neglect as described in DCYF Policy 500.0000, Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect and DCYF Policy 500.0050, Standards for Investigating Child Abuse and Neglect (CA/N) Reports (Levels 1, 2, 3);
3.     Any incident of elder abuse or neglect;
4.     That a Department staff is under the influence of drug/alcohol during the work day or is otherwise unfit for duty; or
5.     That a Department staff has lost his/her driver’s license when that staff either drives as a function of his/her employment or is required to have a valid driver’s license as a condition of employment (and the staff is not taking responsibility for notifying the administration of the loss of license).  Refer to the Department’s Code of Conduct and DCYF Policy 200.0000, Suspension of Employees Driver's License.
 
C.     The PST is activated in the following circumstances:
1.     Death or serious injury to a department staff;
2.     Death or serious physical injury to a child or youth in care; or
3.     Any other incident that has a high emotional impact on the staff person beyond his/her usual experience that creates a heightened sense of vulnerability and/or an experience of lack of control over the situation.
4.     Any department staff can initiate a self-referral to the PST.  A list of members of the PST will be available to all staff.
 
D.     PST provides:
1.     Consultation and information about referrals to staff for job and non-job related problems.
2.     Critical incident stress defusings, debriefings and follow-ups as described in this protocol.
3.     Recommendations to the Wellness Committee concerning areas, such as, stress management, recognition and stress reduction.
 
E.     The director or designee immediately notifies the PST Co-Leaders of the critical incident and provides relevant information.  PST Co-Leaders:
1.     Determine whether an immediate call out of the entire PST, one PST member or any combination thereof is deemed necessary.  If an immediate call out is necessary, the PST Co-Leaders:
a.     Notify PST members and provide relevant information, including where they are needed.
b.     If involved in the incident, the PST Co-Leaders contact the on-call Mental Health professional to determine whether an immediate PST call out is necessary.
2.     If a call out is not necessary, within an appropriate time frame, the PST Co-Leaders:
a.     Advise team members of the situation;
b.     If necessary, arrange for a meeting between the PST and the involved staff at a later date; and
c.     Notify other contacts, such as the Mental Health professional, to seek assistance if necessary.
3.     If members of the PST are called out after hours, they are afforded comp time for the time spent on PST business.
4.     Organize the defusing following the incident and inviting each staff involved to participate.
5.     Coordinate with necessary personnel, including the Mental Health professional, if needed, as to the time and place of a debriefing.
 
F.     Debriefing is conducted within a reasonably appropriate timeframe when possible by a minimum of two PST members:
1.     The primary role of PST members, who participate and assist in each debriefing, is support.  Specific members of the PST can be excluded from the debriefing at the request of a participant(s).
2.     Staff who was actively involved in the incident may attend the debriefing. All support personnel will be invited to attend but not mandated.
3.     The debriefing is conducted without supervisory personnel except any involved in the incident.  The Director or designee may provide a brief introduction prior to the start of the debriefing, as a show of support.
4.     The Mental Health professional may oversee the debriefing.
5.     A PST member makes a follow up call to each participant within 7-1 0 days of the debriefing.
 
G.     The PST keeps no written records that contain personally identifiable information.  For statistical purposes, the PST Co-Leaders provide the total number of contacts to the administrative supervisor for PST functions identified by the Department.
 
 
 
Reporting Subsequent Violations of Probation to the Family Court
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol: 1300.0017
Effective Date:  November 4, 2013                              Version: 1
 
 
A Family Court judge places a child on probation as the result of that child being charged with a delinquent, wayward or status offense.  Juvenile Probation and Parole Officers supervise these youth and ensure compliance with conditions of probation in conformance with DCYF Policy 800.0005, Juvenile Probation Supervision.  In addition, consistent with RI General Law 14-1-33, if, at any time during a child’s probationary term, the child is charged with an additional and subsequent:
 
·     delinquency offense, which if committed by an adult would be considered a felony, the Juvenile Probation/Parole Officer files a petition in the family court alleging that the child has violated probation.
 
·     wayward/disobedient or status offense, the Juvenile Probation/Parole Officer may file a petition in the family court alleging that the child has violated probation.
 
 
Emergency Preparedness and Management
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol:  1300.0040
Effective Date:     January 3, 2014                              Version 1
 
 
The Department of Children, Youth and Families promotes, safeguards and protects the overall well-being of culturally diverse children, youth and families and the communities in which they live through a partnership with families, communities and government.  In the event of a crisis or emergency, the Department collaborates closely with state and local agencies to protect life and property through a program of mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery.  In this way, the Department works with state and community partners to minimize the difficulty and disruption vulnerable children, youth and families experience.
 
 
A.     Foster Care providers have written crisis and emergency response plans in compliance with the Department’s Foster Care and Adoption Regulations for Licensure.
 
B.     Annually, the Department Director or designee reviews the written Emergency Preparedness Plan submitted by each licensed provider/facility caring for children and youth. The plan for each facility includes:
1.     A copy of emergency preparedness and management procedures distributed to facility staff.
2.     Emergency contact information (which includes cellular and landline telephone numbers) for administrative and line staff.
3.     Staffing planned for the duration of the emergency to include an identified decision maker and the chain of command.
4.     Manner of ensuring continuous flow of information to identified caretakers of children (e.g., battery operated radio or other communication devices).
5.     Process for ensuring up to date information on the names and locations of all children and youth assigned to each facility, including those on home visits or weekend passes.
6.     Process for identifying and updating information on youth on Temporary Community Placement or youth being Electronically Monitored and for seeking Family Court approval if the youth must be moved.
7.     Provision of a minimum of five days of basic supplies at each facility including food, water, medication, sanitary supplies, first aid kit, battery powered radio, flash light, cell phones and emergency documents if staff and children remain at the facility.
8.     Proposed evacuation plan which describes:
a.     One nearby location as well as one location out of the area;
b.     How children and youth will be transported;
c.     How the alternative setting is appropriate to children and youth served;
d.     Care and supervision plan for children and youth in that setting, including:
i.     Meals/nutrition including attention to any child specific needs;
ii.     Clothing;
iii.     Medication, Medical Equipment and name of physicians; and
iv.     Activities and plan for child protection in that setting.
9.     The Family Care Network Lead ensures that each partner agency has current plan approved by the Department.
 
C.     The Department or designee reviews and ensures any necessary updates to the Emergency Preparedness Plan for each licensed provider as much in advance of a potential crisis or emergency as feasible, and, whenever possible, seventy-two hours before the identified event.  This review and update (if necessary) ensures that the plan is appropriate to the anticipated emergency or crisis to the extent feasible.
 
D.     The Department ensures the distribution of notice and procedures regarding anticipated crisis or emergency events to kinship providers pending licensing.
 
E.     As much in advance of a potential crisis or emergency as feasible and, whenever possible, seventy-two hours before the identified event, the Department updates:
1.     The Licensed Facilities Preparedness Grid to ensure accuracy of information, including:
a.     Name and location of facility
b.     Approved evacuation site
c.     Contact person and contact information
2.     Department staff contact information, including cellular and landline telephones.
3.     The Living Arrangements List by child/youth including:
a.     RICHIST identification numbers;
b.     Name, date of birth, gender, age, race;
c.     Family Care Network to which the child/youth is assigned, if applicable;
d.     Provider name, service type, caretaker name, contact information, address of living arrangement; and
e.     Primary service worker name and caseload number.
f.     Youth on Temporary Community Placement or youth being Electronically Monitored and Family Court Judge to be notified if movement is required.
4.     The administrator of each Departmental Region and Division prepares a complete list of children and youth on home visits or passes including:
a.     Department supervisor/administrator;
b.     Child’s name;
c.     Location of visit;
d.     Anticipated arrival and return dates;
e.     Facility to which the child/youth is returning; and
f.     Notes regarding any special needs or circumstances.
 
F.     The administrator of each Departmental Region and Division reviews the status of children and youth scheduled to return home during the projected emergency/crisis and the primary service worker consults with supervisor to determine the safest course of action.  A provider/Family Care Networks may offer suggestions regarding the return of children/youth home for the duration of the emergency, however, the final decision is entirely that of the Department.
 
G.     The Department maintains consistent communication with the Family Care Networks and the Family Care Networks maintain consistent communication with Network service providers in anticipation of and during any emergency/crisis.  The Family Care Network:
1.     Communicates available information to providers in a timely manner, including any provided by the RI Emergency Management Agency.
2.     Updates protocols for reporting for the duration of the emergency/crisis.
3.     Provides accurate and updated contact information for Department staff by region, division and unit as well as key administrators.
4.     Provides accurate and updated information on any emergency relocation facilities.
5.     Assists provider agencies in implementing Department approved Emergency Plans and/or addressing any unforeseen barriers to implementation which could impact on safety.
 
H.     The Department instructs the communication carrier to forward calls to the Master Control Center at the RI Training School if the Child Protective Services Hotline fails.  The Department ensures that information described in paragraphs E - G is distributed to senior staff and administrators as well as to Child Protective Services Hotline staff and the Master Control Center at the RI Training School.
 
I.     In the event of an evacuation, the facility/provider:
1.     Notifies the Department as soon as it is safe to do so.
a.     If it is safe to notify the Department prior to evacuation, the facility/provider does so.
b.     If not, the facility/provider notifies the Department as soon as possible after the children and youth have been transported to a safe location.
c.     The Department documents each call on a form maintained by Call Floor and/or Master Control Center staff.
2.     Contacts the Child Protective Services Hotline.  If this telephone number fails, notifies the Master Control Center at the RI Training School.  The following information is provided:
a.     Agency/provider/facility name and address
b.     Name and contact information of the caller
c.     Name and date of birth of each child/youth relocated
d.     Condition of each child/youth and staff
e.     Name and location of facility to which children/youth were relocated
f.     Plan for care and supervision of children/youth in relocation facility
g.     Any additional assistance required to ensure the safety of the child/ youth.
h.     Status of any youth on Electronic Monitoring or Temporary Community Placement.
3.     If a child or youth is injured and/or in need of medical care at any point during the emergency, the provider contacts the Child Protective Services Hotline or, if this telephone number fails, the provider/facility notifies the Master Control Center at the RI Training School.
4.     In the event that all telephone service is down, the providers use good professional judgment and follow directives / communications issued by the RI Emergency Management Agency through available media.
 
J.     Within twenty-four hours of the emergency, within each 24 hour period thereafter and or within twenty-four hours of the restoration of power, each provider contacts the Department with information on the experience of children/youth, any damage to the facility associated with the emergency as well as estimated cost of any damage to the facility, if applicable.
 
K.     In addition, the RI Training School ensures safety of residents and staff in conformance with DCYF Policy 1200.0718, Facility Management and Environmental Safety.
 
Related Policies…
Facility Management and Environmental Safety
Foster Care and Adoption Regulations for Licensure
 
 
Family Care Community Partnership (FCCP) Referral
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol:  1300.0045
Effective Date:     January 3, 2014                         Version 1
 
The Department of Children, Youth and Families promotes, safeguards and protects the overall well-being of culturally diverse children, youth and families and the communities in which they live through a partnership with families, communities and government. The Family Care Community Partnership (FCCP) assists the Department by implementing a wraparound approach at the community level for families that are referred for service.  This protocol provides additional direction to Department staff in addressing the needs of families when the care giver is indicated in the current investigation and has had a previous indication within the prior 12 month period and/or there is prior legal status with the family and/or a prior removal of a child from home.
 
 
A.     When the care giver is indicated in the current investigation and has had an indicated finding within the prior 12 month period and/or there is prior legal status with the family and/or a prior removal of a child from home, administrative review is necessary before an FCCP referral can be made.  The CPI forwards the case to a CPS administrator for review before making such a referral.
 
B.     In considering whether to authorize an FCCP referral, the CPS administrator considers:
1.     History of the case;
2.     Similarity of the indicated instances of child abuse, neglect or maltreatment;
3.     Progress in addressing the identified issue/in working with community resources, including the FCCP, since the last indication/case opening/removal of a child from home;
4.     Protective capacity of the family;
5.     Motivation to change;
6.     Admission of the presenting issue; and
7.     Presence of repeated instances of domestic violence, mental health needs and/or substance abuse needs/relapse.
 
C.     If the caregiver refuses to cooperate with the FCCP and/or does not demonstrate protective capacity, the case is not referred to the FCCP.  The administrator advises the CPI:
1.     To seek a straight petition if the child can be maintained at home with a safety plan or
2.     To seek an ex parte if the child cannot be maintained safely in the home.
 
D.     If the Department’s Legal Counsel disagrees with the decision to file a straight or ex parte petition, the Deputy Director reviews and provides direction.
 
Related Policy...
Family Care Community Partnership (FCCP) Practice Standards
 
 
Administrative Review of Information/Referral (I/R) Reports
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol:  1300.0051
Effective Date:     October 22, 2013                                       
Version 1
 
A report made to the Child Protective Services (CPS) Hotline that contains a concern about the well-being of a child, but does not meet the criteria for an investigation, may be classified as an Information/Referral (I/R) Report. This protocol ensures that all reports classified as Information/ Referrals are reviewed by a Child Protective Services Administrator.
 
 
A.     All calls received by CPS and classified as Information/Referrals are reviewed by the Call Floor Supervisor, who approves or disapproves of the determination to classify the call as an Information/Referral.
 
B.     In addition, the protocol is printed out and placed in the marked box on the Call Floor for administrative review.
1.     At the end of the first and second shifts, a CPS Administrator removes and reviews the protocols.
2.     The third and fourth shift's protocols are reviewed at the beginning of the day.
3.     Weekend protocols are reviewed Monday morning.
4.     In all cases, the CPS Administrator documents his/her review in the Information/ Referral Report Log, which is maintained or destroyed in conformance with the Department’s approved records retention policy.
5.     If the Administrator determines that an Information/Referral requires upgrade, it is documented and generated as such.
 
 
Related Policies:
Criteria for a Child Protective Services Investigation
Information/Referral (I/R) Reports
 
 
Psychotropic Medication Review Plan
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Staff Protocol: 1300.0052
Effective Date: February 10, 2014    
Revised:  September 3, 2014         
Version: 2
 
A child in the care of the Department of Children, Youth and Families (hereinafter, the Department) may benefit from psychotropic medication as one component of a comprehensive treatment plan.  In certain circumstances, a Department Administrator is asked to review and authorize the use of such medications through the DCYF Form 210.  This protocol guides the Department Administrator in completing the DCYF Form 210 by implementing an informed consent process that utilizes medical expertise. In other circumstances, the child’s parent(s)/ guardian(s) retains the right to provide medical consent. The Department now has a consulting Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist (hereinafter, CAP) available on a limited basis to offer support and consultation as described below.
 
A.     When a Department Administrator is asked to review and authorize the use of such medications, the Department’s Primary Worker ensures that the Provider seeking to prescribe a psychotropic medication for a child in the care of the Department completes DCYF Form #210, Request for Administrator Authorization.  The completed DCYF Form #210 is forwarded to the Regional Director, Administrator of Juvenile Probation, or Superintendent of the Training School (hereinafter, the Administrator) for approval.
 
B.     The Administrator reviews the Request for Administrator Authorization:
1     If a new medication is prescribed and if any of the following “red flags” are present, the Administrator forwards the DCYF Form #210 by Email or fax for the review by the CAP:
a.     The child is six years of age or younger.
b.     The child is already on two or more psychotropic medications.
c.     The child is already on one medication in the atypical or 2nd generation, anti-psychotic category and the request is for a second atypical or 2nd generation anti-psychotic; such medications include:
i.     Aripiprazole - generic (also marketed as Abilify)
ii.     Asenapine Maleate - generic (also marketed as Saphris)
iii.     Clozapine - generic (also marketed as Clozaril)
iv.     Iloperidone - generic (also marketed as Fanapt)
v.     Lurasidone - generic (also marketed as Latuda)
vi.     Olanzapine - generic (also marketed as Zyprexa)
vii.     Olanzapine/Fluoxetine - generic (also marketed as Symbyax)
viii.     Paliperidone - generic (also marketed as Invega)
ix.     Quetiapine - generic (also marketed as Seroquel)
x.     Risperidone - generic (also marketed as Risperdal)
xi.     Ziprasidone - generic (also marketed as Geodon)
d.     The Administrator has any concerns about the request based on age, diagnosis or any other factors within the comprehensive treatment plan.
e.     The following information is forwarded to the CAP with the DCYF Form #210, Request for Administrator Authorization, and with DCYF Form 211 Medical Unit Referral Form:
i.     Name and phone number of Primary Worker and/or Supervisor
ii.     Name and phone number of current placement
iii.     Name and phone number of Primary Care Provider/Pediatrician (if different than Provider requesting psychotropic medication authorization)
iv.     Any available past psychiatric records (including hospital or residential discharge summaries)
v.     Current treatment providers/agencies, contact information, and treatment modalities, including school; examples include:
ü     Weekly individual therapy (trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy) with John Smith, LICSW
ü     Group therapy (sexual offender treatment) at specified agency
ü     Therapeutic school placement at School for Children (9th grade with IEP)
ü     Any other information relevant to why new medication being recommended and/or concerns by Primary Worker, Supervisor or Administrator.
2.     The CAP consultation may include review of the:
a.     RICHIST and/or paper file; or
b.     Paper file and discussion with the primary worker/supervisor; or
c.     Paper file, discussion with the primary worker/supervisor and discussion with the identified provider.
3.     On the basis of this review, the CAP will make a recommendation to the Administrator, who either approves or declines to provide consent for the psychotropic medication.
4.     If none of the circumstances identified in B 1 a-c is present:
a.     The Administrator may provide consent for the request by signing approval.
b.     The primary worker notifies the provider.
c.     The primary worker forwards a copy of the completed Request for Administrator Authorization via email or fax to the Medical-Psychiatric Unit for tracking.
 
C.     When a child’s parent(s)/guardian(s) retains the right to provide medical consent, and the primary worker (including Family Service, Child Protective Services/Intake or Probation) has concerns about the use of psychotropic medication within a comprehensive treatment plan,
1.     The primary worker outlines these concerns to his/her supervisor.
2.     If the supervisor concurs, concerns are outlined for the Administrator.
3.     The Administrator may
a.     Present concerns relating to the child during the monthly Psychotropic Medication Rounds meeting with the CAP; or
b.     Forward the referral to the Medical Unit:
i.     The Medical Unit Referral Form (DCYF Form 211) and forwarding by email or placing the completed form in the Medical Unit Office (forms are checked every Tuesday); and
ii.     Compiling and forwarding available psychiatric records, including hospitalization or residential discharge summaries).
4.     In these circumstances, the CAP consultation will not include a formal recommendation regarding medication, but may include:
a.     Review of RICHIST and other hard copy records;
b.     Discussion with the primary worker/supervisor/Administrator, including identification of questions or concerns to raise with parent(s)/guardian(s) and/or clinical providers; and/or
c.     Education of Department staff regarding specific medications, diagnoses and/or access to treatment.
 
D.     In all cases, if the consulting CAP does not respond to the request for consultation within one business day and the request requires urgent response, the Administrator or the Associate Director for Child Welfare Services may contact the consulting CAP by cell phone.
 
 
Maximizing the Use of State Vehicles
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol:  1300.0055
Effective Date:      February 10, 2014                              Version 1
 
 
The Department requires staff to maximize the use of state vehicles in the conduct of state business, including in transporting children or other family members.
 
A.     The Primary Worker first attempts to sign out the unit vehicle (for those units which have a vehicle).  If the unit vehicle is not available, the Primary Worker attempts to obtain a vehicle from another unit; the Primary Worker obtains the permission of the other unit’s supervisor before signing out the vehicle.
 
B.     For units which have a state vehicle:
1.     The supervisor maintains the schedule and keys in an accessible area.
2.     Vehicles are signed out at all times when being used.
3.     For blocks of time in which it appears a vehicle is not being used, workers use the vehicle for transportation (including all transportation to conduct of state business, including transportation of the worker and/or child(ren) and/or family members.
 
C.     At the end of each week, a copy of the schedule of use of each vehicle for the previous week is turned in by the supervisor to the Regional Director or the Chief Investigator or designee. The Regional Director or the Chief Investigator or designee reviews each schedule to make sure that maximum use is being made of each state vehicle.
 
D.     Each worker submits a copy of his/her work schedule(s) together with each mileage reimbursement form.  Copies of all work schedules for the period covered by the mileage reimbursement form must be attached.
 
Network of Care - Referral for Home Based Services
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol: 1300.0061
Effective Date:  February 4, 2014                              Version: 1
 
 
The Department of Children, Youth and Families (hereinafter, the Department) is committed to providing family-focused, home-based services to assist parents and caregivers provide safe and nurturing environments for children. Home-based services are provided through the Networks of Care (hereinafter, the Network), through the Department’s 005 process and in collaboration with other state Departments, including Medicaid.
 
When the primary worker/supervisor identifies the need for a formal, home-based service for a child, youth and family not assigned to a Network of Care, non-Network of Care services are explored first. When it is determined that these non-Network services are not adequate to meet a family’s needs, a referral is submitted to a Family Care Network.
 
A.     Non-Network services may be identified as insufficient when
1.     They do not adequately address family dynamics and needs; or
2.     The Family Court orders the Network service.
 
B.     The Department’s primary worker reviews the family’s need for a home-based service with her/his supervisor to ensure that all possible non-Network services are explored.
 
C.     If the Department’s supervisor/primary worker cannot identify a non-Network service that meets the family’s need and believe that a referral for a network home-based service may be warranted:
1.     The Department’s primary worker completes the Network Community-Based Referral Service Form and forwards it to his/her supervisor for review;
2.     The Supervisor assesses whether there is any non-Network home-based services that are appropriate to meet the needs of the family;
3.     If the Department’s primary worker and supervisor determine that a Network-based service is required, the completed Network Community-Based Referral Service Form is forwarded to the unit Administrator for review.
4.     If the Administrator approves, the Network referral window is completed in RICHIST by the primary worker to generate a Network assignment; the Network Community-Based Referral Service Form is forwarded by the Department’s primary worker to the assigned Network.
5.     The assigned Network reviews the request and may make additional or alternative suggestions, which are considered by the Administrator and Department’s primary worker.
 
 
 
Resident Visitation
Department of Children, Youth and Families
Juvenile Correctional Services – Training School
Department Protocol: 1300.0075
Effective Date: June 1, 2014                              Version 1
 
The Department of Children, Youth and Families recognizes the importance of supporting and nurturing residents’ pro-social connections to family and community.  The Training School provides regular opportunities for visitation with families as described in this protocol as well as special visits deemed necessary for clinical or therapeutic reasons.  Attorney visits occur at all reasonable times during hours that residents are awake.  Visits by the Office of the Child Advocate occur at any time.
 
A.     Staff do not deprive residents on disciplinary status of visits as a punishment.  Residents on disciplinary status may have visits as specified herein unless such visits would pose a threat to the safety of the residents and/or security of the facility.
 
B.     The Unit Manager develops a visitation list with the resident upon entry to the facility.  The Unit Manager explains to the resident any exclusion from the approved visitation list.  The resident may grieve the approved list in conformance with DCYF Policy 1200.1206: Resident Grievance Procedure.
1.     Residents are encouraged to visit with parents/guardians, grandparents and siblings.
2.     Staff encourage visitation with the resident’s children and provide appropriate support to the parent/child relationship.
3.     When a resident has no available family members to visit, staff make every effort to identify other visiting resources for him/her.
4.     The clinical social worker or Unit Manager can approve special visits to address scheduling conflicts or special events or special visitors or to accommodate a family event/emergency.
a.     The resident or family member requests such a visit from the clinical social worker or Unit Manager, who provides a timely response.
b.     The resident may grieve a denial of a special visit in conformance with DCYF Policy 1200.1206: Resident Grievance Procedure.
5.     Individuals who pose a specific and credible threat to the safety of the residents or the security of the facility.  The resident may grieve such exclusion in conformance with DCYF Policy 1200.1206: Resident Grievance Procedure.
6.     Individuals who are identified in a no contact order issued by a court of competent jurisdiction are excluded from visitation.  Any appeal of this decision is to the court issuing the order of no contact.
 
C.     The clinical social worker/Unit Manager identifies and facilitates any visitation necessary for clinical or therapeutic reasons; such visits are over and above others described in this protocol.
 
D.     Family visiting occurs on several days of the week.
1.     Each resident is afforded an opportunity for at least one visit of at least one hour per week.
2.     Additional visits may be earned through the Incentive System.  Refer to the Resident Handbook and DCYF Policy 1200.0103. Incentive System - Points and Levels.
3.     Staff posts a schedule of visiting hours and rules. 
4.     Staff makes every opportunity to accommodate family members if conflicts prevent visitation at the Unit’s scheduled time.
5.     Staff supervises the visiting area, but do not monitor conversations, absent a reasonable suspicion that a crime, escape or threat to safety or security may occur. 
6.     The facility is accessible via public transportation.
 
E.     The contraband and search policy for visitors is posted at the entrance to the facility.
 
F.     Visitors may ask questions or register complaints about the treatment of youth.  Staff, the Unit manager on duty or administrators promptly reply to such questions or complaints.  In addition, families may utilize the facility grievance procedure; refer to DCYF Policy 1200.1206: Resident Grievance Procedure.
 
G.     There are regular family forums at which families of detained youth may voice issues of concern, offer suggestions for improvement, and obtain needed information about institutional policies and practices.
 
H.     Search of residents following visits is conducted in conformance with DCYF Policy 1200.0819:  Search of a Resident of the RI Training School.
 
Related Policies:
Resident Grievance Procedure
Incentive System - Points and Levels
Search of a Resident of the RI Training School
 
 
Resident Mail
Department of Children, Youth and Families
Juvenile Correctional Services – Training School
Department Protocol: 1300.0080
Effective Date: June 1, 2014                             
Version 1
 
Training School staff support and facilitate resident correspondence as long as it does not negatively impact on the security of the facility or on community safety.
 
Protocol
 
A.     Staff do not limit the number of letters a youth may send or receive, including youth on disciplinary status.  Staff provide youth with a reasonable amount of paper, access to writing implements and postage for correspondence.
 
B.     Staff do not open or read mail to and/or from attorneys, the courts, the press, the Office of the Child Advocate or public officials.
 
C.     Staff distribute incoming mail Monday through Saturday, except holidays.
1.     All incoming mail may be opened and inspected for contraband, but letters may not be read, intercepted or delayed.  The staff open and inspect mail in the presence of the resident.
2.     Staff distribute mail within 24 hours of arrival at the facility.
3.     Residents may not receive mail from any individual identified in a “no contact” order issued by a court of competent jurisdiction.
4.     If mail is with held for any reason, staff:
a.     inform the youth;
b.     log the date, time and reason in the Unit Log Book; and
c.     advise the youth that he/she may file a grievance in conformance with DCYF Policy 1200.1206:  Resident Grievance Procedure.
5.     Residents may receive reasonable numbers of books and magazines, which may be inspected for contraband.  Residents must, in all cases, have sufficient funds to pay for any magazine subscription.
 
D.     Staff post outgoing mail without delay and no later than within 24 hours of receipt of mail from the resident.
1.     Staff inspect outgoing mail for contraband but do not censor such mail.
2.     Mail must be properly addressed with only appropriate contact information on the envelope.
3.     Residents may not send mail to any individual identified in a “no contact” order issued by a court of competent jurisdiction.
4.     Staff do not post letters to parents(s)/guardian(s) if the parent/guardian has formally requested to restrict mail from the resident.
5.     Staff must inform the resident why his/her outgoing mail is restricted and enter the reason in the Unit Log Book.
6.     The resident may write to the Superintendent to ask for an explanation which must be provided in writing and/or file a grievance in conformance with DCYF Policy 1200.1206:  Resident Grievance Procedure.
 
 
Interim Individual Education Plan
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol:  1300.0085
Effective Date:     October 20, 2014                        
Version 1
 
 
The Department of Children, Youth and Families complies in all respects with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). In some circumstance, resident eligible for Special Education Services enter the RITS with an expired Individual Education Plan (IEP) or with a plan that expires shortly after entry into the RITS. The facility provides interim services that match the expired IEP as closely as possible until a new plan can be completed in conformance with state and federal law.  Interim plans are documented and discussed with parents/guardians as described in this protocol.
 
A.     State and federal law provide that the new public agency (i.e., the RITS) is not required to conduct an IEP meeting when:
1.     A copy of the child’s current IEP is available;
2.     The parent(s) indicate that they are satisfied with the current IEP; and
3.     The new public agency (i.e., the RITS) determines that the current IEP is appropriate and can be implemented as written.
 
B.     To comply fully with the standard outlined in paragraph A, the RITS school representative at the initial Individual Treatment Plan meeting will:
1.     Review the most recent IEP with the parent(s).
2.     If the parent(s) agree that the standards in paragraph A have been met, have the parent(s) sign an addendum to the most recent IEP so stipulating.
3.     When a resident eligible for Special Education Services enters the RITS with an expired IIEP or with an IEP that expires shortly after entry:
a.     The RITS School staff inform the parent(s) that a new IEP will be written when the full IEP team can be assembled and educational information has been gathered on how the resident is performing academically.
b.     If the parent(s) agree that the standards in paragraph A have been met with regard to the expired IEP, the parent(s) sign an addendum so stipulating and identified services are provided on an interim basis until the new IEP is developed.
 
 
Emergency Preparedness and Management at the RITS
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol:  1300.0090
Effective Date:     July 17, 2014                        
Version 1
 
The Department of Children, Youth and Families promotes, safeguards and protects the overall well-being of youth at the Rhode Island Training School for Youth.  In the event of a crisis or emergency, the Department collaborates closely with state and local agencies to protect life and property through a program of mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery.  In this way, the Department works with vital partners to minimize the difficulty and disruption youth experience while ensuring that youth and staff are well prepared for an emergency.
 
 
A.     In all circumstance staff adhere to DCYF Policy 1200.0714: Safety and Emergency Procedures at the RI Training School.  Staff immediately report any breach or insufficiency in emergency procedures, inspections, equipment or systems to the Superintendent or designee.
 
B.     Staff conduct fire drills on monthly and on a rotating basis by shift. Staff document these drills including how long it takes to unlock doors and get residents cleared from the building.
 
Related Policy...
Facility Management and Environmental Safety
 
 
Documentation and Approval of Training Activities at the RITS
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol:  1300.0095
Effective Date:      August 19, 2014                        
Version 1
 
 
The Department of Children, Youth and Families adheres to the protocols for approval and documentation of training outlined by the Child Welfare Institute at Rhode Island College.  Administrators do not hold or approve training for any staff without adhering in every respect to this protocol.
 
 
A.     The administrator offering or causing to be offered or approving any training for staff documents that the identified training has been approved by the Child Welfare Institute as described in this protocol.
 
B.     If such approval (as described in paragraph A) has not been obtained, the Administrator or designee completes the Training Proposal Application and submits the form to the Child Welfare Institute Director or designee.
 
C.     The Director of the Child Welfare Institute will approve or disapprove the submitted Training Proposal. If approved, the Child Welfare Institute will create a field in RICHIST for population with the names of staff who complete the training.
 
D.     It is the Child Welfare Institute staff’s responsibility to ensure that documentation is complete for all staff trained. Reports are available following data entry.
 
 
Maintaining Safe Food Temperatures at the RI Training School
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families – Training School
Department Protocol: 1300.0100
Effective Date: August 29, 2014                              
Version 1
 
The Department ensures that all food served at the Rhode Island Training School is stored and served at safe temperatures.  In all instances, staff comply with DCYF Policy 1200.0900, Food Service.  This protocol provides additional direction to ensure that the facility adheres to applicable standards when food is transported from the kitchen in the Youth Development Center to any of the residential units.
 
 
A.     The temperature of food is taken when the food arrives in the Unit and is properly documented in the Unit Log Book.
1.     Hot food is served at 140 degrees Fahrenheit or above.
2.     Cold food is served at 40 degrees Fahrenheit or below.
3.     Protocol for testing the temperature of food:
a.     Remove the thermometer from the sleeve;
b.     Wipe with Alcohol Prep (provided);
c.     Insert thermometer into the middle of the food item and let stand for fifteen seconds;
d.     Read the temperature before removing the thermometer from the food item; and
e.     Rinse thermometer before replacing it into the sleeve.
 
B.     To ensure that the temperature in the Unit refrigerators meet applicable standards:
1.     The thermometer is kept in the back of the middle shelf in the refrigerator to obtain an accurate reading; the thermometer is not kept on the door.
2.     The Unit Manager notes and records the temperature of the refrigerator on the Weekly Mod Inspection Report and reports any problem to the State Building and Grounds Coordinator.
3.     The State Building and Grounds Coordinator also checks and documents the temperature in each Unit refrigerator weekly and takes appropriate action to address any problem identified.
 
C.     Any food not at proper temperature is not served to residents. Staff notify the kitchen immediately for remediation.
 
Related Policy...
Food Service
 
Documentation of Use of Mechanical Restraints
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol:  1300.0105
Effective Date:      August 24, 2014                        
Version 1
 
In all instances, staff conform with DCYF Policy.  It is essential that all staff carefully document the time and date that a resident is placed in and removed from mechanical restraints.
 
A.     In all instances, Juvenile Program Workers record in the Unit Log the date and time the resident is placed in and released from mechanical restraints within the shift on which the restraint/release occurred.
 
B.     These Log entries are initialed by the Unit Manager/Late Duty Unit Manager within the shift on which the restraint/release occurred.
 
C.     In the event that a Unit Manager/Late Duty Unit Manager is not on site, staff immediately notify the Master Control Center of the restraint/release of the resident.  The MCC documents the time and date of the restraint/release in the MCC log.
 
 
Maintaining Linens, Towels and Clothing at the RITS in Good Condition
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol:  1300.0110
Effective Date:      October 20, 2014                        
Version 1
 
 
The Department of Children, Youth and Families adheres to the protocols for inspection and retiring of linens, articles of clothing and towels issued to residents of the RI Training School. Residents are not issued frayed, discolored or damaged linens, towels or clothing. 
 
 
 
A.     Each Unit Manager inspects the condition of linens, towels and clothing issued to residents no less than weekly and documents this inspection in the Weekly Mod Inspection Report.  Any linen, towel or clothing that is frayed, damaged or discolored is retired.
 
B.     The Unit Managers and State Building and Grounds Coordinator ensure that a sufficient inventory of such new linens, towels or articles of clothing as are necessary to meet residents’ needs are maintained in the living units and the warehouse.
 
 
Care Management
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol:  1300.0115
Effective Date:     October 10, 2014                        
Version 1
 
The Department is mandated to provide services appropriate to the needs of children, youth and families in its care within its fiscal appropriation level.  The Department maximizes the effectiveness of services and supports to address the unique needs of each child, youth and family in the least restrictive environment consistent with permanency, safety and well-being.  As much as possible, the Department provides services and supports to children and youth in a family setting, including the family home or a kinship/foster or adoptive home.  If placement in a congregate care setting is necessary on a time limited basis, ongoing efforts are undertaken to ensure that the child or youth is returned to a family setting as soon as possible consistent with permanency, safety and well-being. 
 
A.     The Diligent Recruitment of Child Specific Homes Initiative targets children and youth assigned to a Family Service Unit/Juvenile Probation who are currently placed in a congregate care setting but who could safely be placed in a family setting if identified service barriers were addressed.
1.     For children/youth assigned to a Family Service Unit/Juvenile Probation, the identified administrator will provide to the Administrator of Licensing the following:
a.     The name, date of birth and case number of all such children and youth within the Region/Division.
b.     Identification of the service needs that are currently preventing placement in a family setting.
2.     The Administrator of Licensing will empanel a working group including but not limited to:
a.     The Project Director of the Diligent Recruitment Grant,
b.     Chief Human Services Policy & Systems Analyst (Adoption),
c.     Community Services Coordinator (Foster Care),
d.     Federal Benefits and Contracts Administrator,
e.     Assistant Administrators of CSBH or their Designee,
f.     Family Care Networks, and
g.     Therapeutic Foster Care providers.
3.     Within 60 days, the Working Group will:
a.     Identify appropriate and available services to support the movement of the child or youth from a congregate care to a family setting and
b.     Undertake a child/youth specific recruitment effort to identify an appropriate family setting.
 
B.     The Regional Case Review Meetings, chaired by the Regional Director, will have a standing agenda item to review, by Region and Division:
1.     Children and Youth in the congregate care settings who can safely be placed in a less restrictive setting if identified service barriers/needs are addressed.
2.     Children and Youth placed in Congregate Care facilities are reviewed as follows:
a.     Children and Youth in out of state placement for 180 days or more;
b.     Children and Youth in group homes and residential placements in state for 180 days or more;
c.     Children and Youth with special treatment needs (including therapeutic foster care, Developmental Delays) in placement for 180 days or more;
d.     Children and youth in shelters for 30 days or more; and
e.     Youth aged 17.5 and older for consideration of referral to the YES Program.
3.     The Regional Director will review relevant information regarding each child and youth:
a.     The CANS will be provided to the Department’s primary worker and supervisor within five business days of completion by the provider and shared with the Regional Director prior to the Regional Review Meeting.
b.     Utilization Management information will be provided to the Department’s primary worker and supervisor by the Network within five business days of completion and shared with the Regional Director prior to the Regional Review Meeting.
c.     Relevant information regarding service needs preventing placement in a less restrictive setting will be provided to the Regional Director by the primary worker/supervisor.
4.     The Regional Director:
a.     Assigns tasks as necessary to identify and procure the appropriate less restrictive setting as well as services appropriate to any identified barriers to transition to the appropriate and less restrictive setting; and
b.     Identifies a timeframe for subsequent review and/or reports by the primary worker/supervisor; review and reporting is no less than quarterly.
 
C.     The Department’s Chief Financial Officer will provide the Regional and Divisional Administrators with financial and service data, including:
1.     Data regarding service delivery, length of stay and expenditures by Region and Division at a bi-weekly meeting attended by the:
a.     Director, Deputy Director, Associate Director and Chief Financial Officer;
b.     Regional Directors;
c.     Administrators of Juvenile Probation and the RI Training School;
d.     Administrator of Licensing; and
e.     Chief Legal Counsel.
2.     No less than monthly, the Chief Financial Officer will provide expenditure reports that identify the cost of services provided as well as the amount of funds appropriated the period.
 
 
Administration of Non-Prescription Medication
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families – Training School
Department Protocol:  1300.0120
Effective Date:      October 20, 2014                        
Version 1
 
 
Only such personnel who are authorized by state law administer non-prescription medications to residents of the Training School.  When, Juvenile Program Workers consult Registered Nurses between the hours of 7:00 AM and 11:00 PM daily; Registered Nurses administer and record the use of non- prescription medications to residents.  This protocol provides further direction to staff when Registered Nurses are not available on site (between 11:00 PM and 7:00 AM) and applies only to the use of Tylenol.
 
A.     If any resident requires Tylenol between the hours of 11:00 PM and 7:00 AM, the physician on call is contacted.  Tylenol is only administered with the approval of the on-call physician.
 
B.     Before administrating Tylenol staff insure:
1.     By verifying, through the unit log book and in consultation with on duty JPW, that resident has not received any prior medication; and
2.     Proper sanitarily conditions either using gloves or placing the Tylenol in the bottle cap to avoid contamination.
 
C.     From 11:00 PM to 7:00 AM, staff insure proper ingestion of Tylenol and guard against misuse.  Staff:
1.     Isolate resident and maintain a direct line of vision to ensure that the Tylenol is ingested.
2.     Require the resident to open his/her mouth, lift his/her tongue and rotate palms, showing hands after administration.
3.     Secure cap from the resident and check to insure the pill is not in the cup.
4.     Log in unit log book and forward e- mail to RITS clinic to include resident’s name, date and time.
5.     The following day, the Clinic, documents the administration of Tylenol as appropriate in the resident’s medical record.
 
 
Library Resources at the RI Training School
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol:  1300.0130
Effective Date:     October 20, 2014                        
Version 1
 
The Department of Children, Youth and Families provides reading materials geared to the reading levels, interests and primary languages of residents.
 
 
A.     At the end of each school year, the school principal reviews reading material available to youth in hard copy and electronic format to determine if resources are sufficient in light of reading levels, interests and primary languages of residents.
 
B.     The school principal identifies any required additions and or updates and brings this information to the attention of the Superintendent or designee.
 
C.     The Superintendent assists in procuring necessary resources by authorizing acquisition or by requesting funds through the Department budgetary process.
 
Related Policy...
Education Program at the Rhode Island Training School
 
 
Voluntary Time Out for a Resident at the RITS
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol:  1300.0135
Effective Date:     August 8, 2014                        
Version 1
 
The Department of Children, Youth and Families promotes, safeguards and protects the overall well-being of youth at the Rhode Island Training School for Youth in part by encouraging youth to practice appropriate self-regulation.  Staff accommodate a reasonable request from a resident who recognizes that he/she will benefit from a brief and voluntary time out to cool off or regain his/her composure. 
 
A.     During a voluntary time out, the resident removes him/her self to his/her room for a period not to exceed one hour. Staff perform room checks in conformance with DCYF Policy 1200.0839, Fifteen Minute Room Checks.
 
B.     Staff record the beginning and ending time of the voluntary time out in the unit log.
 
C.     The resident may return to programming automatically without requesting permission from staff.
 
 
Functional Assessment Procedures for Network Providers of Congregate Care, Specialized Foster Care, Independent Living, and Semi-Independent Living Services
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol:  1300.0140
Effective Date:      November 1, 2014                              Version 1
 
Functional assessments are measures of overall functioning, well-being and/or problem behaviors of children, adolescents and families served in the system of care.  The Department uses three types of functional assessments: the Child Adolescent Needs and Strengths Assessment (CANS), the Ohio Scales Assessment (OS), and the Ages and Stages Questionnaire-Social Emotional Assessment (ASQ-SE).  Each of these functional assessments is standardized, valid, reliable and culturally appropriate for use with children, adolescents and families served in the system of care.
 
A.     The Department provides or contracts for training for all functional assessments.
1.     Providers ensure that staff completing CANS assessments obtain training and are re-certified annually.
2.     OS and ASQ-SE training is provided with CANS training to ensure that providers can complete all functional assessments as needed.
3.     An online tool for OS and ASQ-SE training is available for providers.
 
B.     The Department requires the CANS, OS, or ASQ-SE be completed by the out-of-home provider of the following services: Congregate Care, Specialized Foster Care, Independent Living, and Semi-Independent Living.
1.     The provider submits a copy of the completed CANS, OS and/or ASQ-SE to the Department’s primary service worker.
a.     If applicable, a Network Care Coordinator (NCC) ensures that completed functional assessments are used to inform the family team meeting to support the Wraparound Services process.
b.     When an NCC is not involved with the family, the provider ensures the completed assessments are used to inform the family team meeting to support the Wraparound process.
2.     If the provider is not present, the Department’s primary service worker' ensures that completed functional assessments are used to inform the family team meeting to support the Wraparound Services process.
3.     The assessments are also used to inform service planning.
 
C.     Networks of Care monitor the administration of the CANS, OS, or ASQ-SE assessments and submit a monthly compliance report regarding the administration of the functional assessments to the Department.
 
D.     All functional assessments (CANS, OS, ASQ-SE) are administered to children on the following schedule:
1.     Within thirty days of entry into a setting or service that provides Congregate Care, Specialized Foster Care, Independent Living, or Semi-Independent Living;
2.     Every ninety days thereafter; and,
3.     Within thirty days of a planned transition to permanency.
 
E.     Child Adolescent Needs and Strengths Assessment (CANS) is:
1.     Completed at the child level for children five years of age and older (or who will turn five within the next six months).
2.     A support tool to guide professional decisions about the child and family, to facilitate communication among service providers and the family, and to support service planning.
3.     A widely-used evidence-based standardized assessment tool that enables practitioners to organize information about a child and family to support effective service planning and decision-making.
4.     Not intended to replace independent professional judgment or decision-making.
5.     Completed through the compilation of any or all of the following:
a.     an intake interview with a child’s caregiver;
b.     information from records;
c.     completed forms; and,
d.     contact with child or family providers.
i.     Once the CANS is completed, it can be updated without a caregiver interview if information is available about the child’s personal circumstances to ensure that the updated CANS is timely and accurate.
ii.     Additional information from the caregiver, youth, other providers or existing records may be required to assist in updating the CANS.
 
F.     Ohio Scales assessment (OS)
1.     A well-established, standardized assessment tool for caseworkers, providers, and clinicians that provides a reliable and valid assessment of child functional and problem behaviors.
a.     There are three equivalent forms – worker, parent, and youth – that can be administered depending on the circumstances of a case.
b.     The Department prefers the use of the worker form.
c.     The OS is developed for children ages five and up.
2.     An initial OS is completed using the worker form version through information provided by the parent, but supplemented as appropriate, with additional information available to the provider or clinician from other sources.
3.     A subsequent OS can be completed by the worker or in collaboration with the parent.
4.     If necessary, an OS can be completed using the parent or youth version of the form.
 
G.     Ages and Stages Questionnaire-Social Emotional assessment (ASQ-SE)
1.     Is a standardized screening and assessment tool for service providers to identify social or emotional difficulties for children from birth through six years of age.  The ASQ-SE may help identify children for whom a more extensive assessment is needed.
2.     The ASQ-SE is completed through a brief interview with the parent that focuses on a child's behavior and social interactions.
3.     Responses are scored based on the child’s developmental age to determine whether the child's development is progressing as expected or requires further evaluation or intervention.
 
H.     Scoring
1.     Providers who complete a CANS score it using the Rhode Island Coding Definitions Worksheet.
a.     Scored items from the worksheet are entered into the RI Data Warehouse electronic database.
b.     The worksheet is kept as part of the child’s service record so that it can be viewed and updated as needed.
c.     CANS data is submitted quarterly so that scores can inform service planning.
d.     A copy of the RI CANS Assessment User Guide_RI Data Warehouse instructions is provided.
e.     Providers receive training on scoring and entering information into the RI data warehouse.
2.     Scores on all assessments are part of a child’s record; however, final scores for the OS and ASQ-SE are only entered directly into RICHIST, the Department’s child welfare information system.  Instructions for entering the OS and ASQ-SE into RICHIST are provided in the Appendix under: “Assessment Tab” - RICHIST Data Entry for Functional Assessments.
 
Contacting the State Police for Emergency Registry of Motor Vehicle Data During Off-Business Hours
Rhode Island Department of Children, Youth and Families
Department Protocol:  1300.0155
Effective Date:      May 11, 2015                        
Version 1
 
To assist the Department’s Child Protective Services (CPS) Division, the RI State Police have established procedures for obtaining license or registration information.  This protocol outlines the process CPS staff follow for seeking and documenting receipt of this information during off business hours.
 
A.     CPS staff receive a code that must be used to access this information from the State Police and this code is kept confidential.
 
B.     Information from the State Police is sought only to conduct the official business of the Department.
 
C.     Information is sought only in emergency situations after regular business hours and is limited to operator license and vehicle registration.
 
D.     CPS Staff call 401.444.1195 to initiate the request and obtain the data. 
 
E.     The Emergency Request for Information (Form # 300) is completed within two weeks of the request and sent by email risp.control@risp.dps.ri.gov. A completed copy of the Emergency Request for Information (Form 300) is also included with the investigative case file.